Nursing Home Residents Who Wander: A Descriptive Study Using the Missouri MDS Database

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161279
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Home Residents Who Wander: A Descriptive Study Using the Missouri MDS Database
Abstract:
Nursing Home Residents Who Wander: A Descriptive Study Using the Missouri MDS Database
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Aud, Myra, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Sinclair SON, Building (S422), Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Co-Authors:Marilyn J. Rantz, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor
Wandering is a frequently observed behavior in older adults with dementia that has been identified as problematic by families and other caregivers. To better understand this behavior as it occurs in the nursing home setting, this study used a cross-sectional exploration of selected variables from Missouri’s Minimum Data Set (MDS v 2.0) database to investigate the characteristics of residents who wander as a unique group and in comparison to non-wandering residents. Missouri’s MDS database contains the electronically submitted MDS forms documenting the comprehensive assessments of nursing home residents in Medicaid- or Medicare-certified beds. The sample consisted of 33,699 residents who were assigned to two groups according to the responses to MDS item E4a: residents who wander (n=4,328 or 12.84%) and residents who do not wander (n=29,371). Because the power of this large sample would make even small differences significant, only descriptive statistics were used. The findings describe the characteristics of the wanderers as a group and display similarities and differences between the wanderers and non-wanderers. Compared to the non-wanderers, greater relative proportions of wanderers were easily distracted and had periods of altered perception, episodes of disorganized speech, periods of restlessness, diurnal variation in cognition, and impaired ability to understand others. Greater percentages of wanderers asked repetitive questions, had repetitive verbalizations, and expressed persistent anger, unreal fears and repetitive anxious complaints. Relatively more wanderers displayed behaviors that were described as verbally abusive, physically abusive, socially inappropriate or disruptive, and resisting care. Antipsychotic medication use was relatively higher for the wanderers, but antidepressant medication use was approximately equivalent. Pain symptoms were present for 26% of the wanderers and 38% of the non-wanderers. Surprisingly, only 40% of the wanderers had been placed in Alzheimer’s special care units. These interesting findings have implications for clinical practice and suggest areas for future research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Home Residents Who Wander: A Descriptive Study Using the Missouri MDS Databaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161279-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Home Residents Who Wander: A Descriptive Study Using the Missouri MDS Database</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aud, Myra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair SON, Building (S422), Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn J. Rantz, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Wandering is a frequently observed behavior in older adults with dementia that has been identified as problematic by families and other caregivers. To better understand this behavior as it occurs in the nursing home setting, this study used a cross-sectional exploration of selected variables from Missouri&rsquo;s Minimum Data Set (MDS v 2.0) database to investigate the characteristics of residents who wander as a unique group and in comparison to non-wandering residents. Missouri&rsquo;s MDS database contains the electronically submitted MDS forms documenting the comprehensive assessments of nursing home residents in Medicaid- or Medicare-certified beds. The sample consisted of 33,699 residents who were assigned to two groups according to the responses to MDS item E4a: residents who wander (n=4,328 or 12.84%) and residents who do not wander (n=29,371). Because the power of this large sample would make even small differences significant, only descriptive statistics were used. The findings describe the characteristics of the wanderers as a group and display similarities and differences between the wanderers and non-wanderers. Compared to the non-wanderers, greater relative proportions of wanderers were easily distracted and had periods of altered perception, episodes of disorganized speech, periods of restlessness, diurnal variation in cognition, and impaired ability to understand others. Greater percentages of wanderers asked repetitive questions, had repetitive verbalizations, and expressed persistent anger, unreal fears and repetitive anxious complaints. Relatively more wanderers displayed behaviors that were described as verbally abusive, physically abusive, socially inappropriate or disruptive, and resisting care. Antipsychotic medication use was relatively higher for the wanderers, but antidepressant medication use was approximately equivalent. Pain symptoms were present for 26% of the wanderers and 38% of the non-wanderers. Surprisingly, only 40% of the wanderers had been placed in Alzheimer&rsquo;s special care units. These interesting findings have implications for clinical practice and suggest areas for future research. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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