Computer Conferencing During a Clinical Practicum Course: Building Connections and Confidence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161280
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Computer Conferencing During a Clinical Practicum Course: Building Connections and Confidence
Abstract:
Computer Conferencing During a Clinical Practicum Course: Building Connections and Confidence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Babenko-Mould, Yolanda, MScN, BScN, RN
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:SON, Health Sciences Addition, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada
Co-Authors:Mary-Anne Andrusyszyn, EdD, MScN, RN, Associate Professor; Dolly Goldenberg, PhD, MScN, MA, RN, Associate Professor
Researchers examined how computer conferencing (CC) influenced baccalaureate nursing (BScN) students’ self-efficacy (SE) for professional nursing competencies (PNC) and computer-mediated learning (CML). Sample: The convenience sample included 42 direct-entry, 4th year BScN students. Theoretical Framework: Bandura's Theory of Self-Efficacy. Methods: The quasi-experiment with descriptive analysis involved completing pre and posttest instruments examining students’ SE for PNC and completing a demographics survey at pretest. Volunteers who only completed instruments were assigned to the control group. Of those who also volunteered to participate online, 15 were randomly assigned to form the intervention group and completed a SE for CML instrument at posttest. During the 3-month clinical practicum, in addition to clinical practice and three planned face-to-face sessions, the intervention group engaged in ongoing CC discussions using WebCT that focused on sharing and reflecting on professional practice and personal experiences. Results: Overall, participants demonstrated higher levels of SE for PNC at posttest than at pretest (F (1,34)=46.61, p<. 05). However, the intervention groups’ posttest scores were not statistically different than the control groups’ (p>.05). There was a significant difference in online students’ SE for CML posttest scores (p<. 05). Online participants moderately agreed that CML was a teaching method that enhanced their learning (M=5.17, SD=0.83). Themes emanating from a descriptive analysis of an open-ended question regarding strengths of CML included: connection, support, learning, sharing. Students noted that time and Internet access were challenges of CML. Conclusions: Educators may acquire relevant information into how participation in CC may contribute to students’ beliefs in their capabilities to integrate PNC and CML into practice settings. Further, educators may consider how strengths associated with CML add to students’ sense of learning community. Insights gained may assist curriculum development processes when considering CML strategies to support clinical courses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComputer Conferencing During a Clinical Practicum Course: Building Connections and Confidenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161280-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Computer Conferencing During a Clinical Practicum Course: Building Connections and Confidence </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Babenko-Mould, Yolanda, MScN, BScN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Health Sciences Addition, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary-Anne Andrusyszyn, EdD, MScN, RN, Associate Professor; Dolly Goldenberg, PhD, MScN, MA, RN, Associate Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Researchers examined how computer conferencing (CC) influenced baccalaureate nursing (BScN) students&rsquo; self-efficacy (SE) for professional nursing competencies (PNC) and computer-mediated learning (CML). Sample: The convenience sample included 42 direct-entry, 4th year BScN students. Theoretical Framework: Bandura's Theory of Self-Efficacy. Methods: The quasi-experiment with descriptive analysis involved completing pre and posttest instruments examining students&rsquo; SE for PNC and completing a demographics survey at pretest. Volunteers who only completed instruments were assigned to the control group. Of those who also volunteered to participate online, 15 were randomly assigned to form the intervention group and completed a SE for CML instrument at posttest. During the 3-month clinical practicum, in addition to clinical practice and three planned face-to-face sessions, the intervention group engaged in ongoing CC discussions using WebCT that focused on sharing and reflecting on professional practice and personal experiences. Results: Overall, participants demonstrated higher levels of SE for PNC at posttest than at pretest (F (1,34)=46.61, p&lt;. 05). However, the intervention groups&rsquo; posttest scores were not statistically different than the control groups&rsquo; (p&gt;.05). There was a significant difference in online students&rsquo; SE for CML posttest scores (p&lt;. 05). Online participants moderately agreed that CML was a teaching method that enhanced their learning (M=5.17, SD=0.83). Themes emanating from a descriptive analysis of an open-ended question regarding strengths of CML included: connection, support, learning, sharing. Students noted that time and Internet access were challenges of CML. Conclusions: Educators may acquire relevant information into how participation in CC may contribute to students&rsquo; beliefs in their capabilities to integrate PNC and CML into practice settings. Further, educators may consider how strengths associated with CML add to students&rsquo; sense of learning community. Insights gained may assist curriculum development processes when considering CML strategies to support clinical courses. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.