2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161281
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patterns of Depressive Symptoms in Children
Abstract:
Patterns of Depressive Symptoms in Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bailey, Mary, ND, RN, APN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Mennonite CON, 616 Hessel Blvd, Champaign, IL, 61820, USA
Co-Authors:Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, Associate Dean and Associate Professor; Marjorie M. V. Heinzer, PhD, MSN, RN, CS, CRNP, Associate Professor; Marion M. Hemstrom-Krainess, DNSc, RNCS, Assistant Professor
Patterns of Depressive Symptoms in Children Abstract Depressive symptoms in children have been linked to suicidal behavior, recurrent problems with depression throughout their lifetimes, risky health behaviors such as smoking and drinking, increased sexual activity, and school problems. Depressive symptoms are reported at rates three to four times greater by adolescent girls than adolescent boys. Few nursing studies have addressed issues of gender-related depressive symptoms in younger, school-aged children. In the present study the presence of gender, grade, and age differences in depressive symptoms in children ages 10-12 years was explored. Patterns of differences on the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI) were examined from a previous study that reported findings from a convenience sample of 122 suburban middle-class public school 5th and 6th graders. Although gender differences in this community sample were not statistically significant, a pattern of depressive symptoms was found in which girls reported more internalizing and negative self-esteem, and boys reported more externalizing and school problems. These patterns of depressive symptoms reported by preadolescent girls were similar to previously reported patterns of older adolescent girls and women. These findings suggest that gender-related differences in patterns of depressive symptoms are present even before adolescence. Furthermore, if these gender differences are found in a community sample, they might be a normative part of development. Issues such as gender role socialization, menarche, internalizing cognitions, and negative self-esteem were reviewed. Future studies should examine the efficacy of interventions such as learned resourcefulness in preventing depressive symptoms in school-aged girls.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatterns of Depressive Symptoms in Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161281-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patterns of Depressive Symptoms in Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bailey, Mary, ND, RN, APN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mennonite CON, 616 Hessel Blvd, Champaign, IL, 61820, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, Associate Dean and Associate Professor; Marjorie M. V. Heinzer, PhD, MSN, RN, CS, CRNP, Associate Professor; Marion M. Hemstrom-Krainess, DNSc, RNCS, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Patterns of Depressive Symptoms in Children Abstract Depressive symptoms in children have been linked to suicidal behavior, recurrent problems with depression throughout their lifetimes, risky health behaviors such as smoking and drinking, increased sexual activity, and school problems. Depressive symptoms are reported at rates three to four times greater by adolescent girls than adolescent boys. Few nursing studies have addressed issues of gender-related depressive symptoms in younger, school-aged children. In the present study the presence of gender, grade, and age differences in depressive symptoms in children ages 10-12 years was explored. Patterns of differences on the Children&rsquo;s Depression Inventory (CDI) were examined from a previous study that reported findings from a convenience sample of 122 suburban middle-class public school 5th and 6th graders. Although gender differences in this community sample were not statistically significant, a pattern of depressive symptoms was found in which girls reported more internalizing and negative self-esteem, and boys reported more externalizing and school problems. These patterns of depressive symptoms reported by preadolescent girls were similar to previously reported patterns of older adolescent girls and women. These findings suggest that gender-related differences in patterns of depressive symptoms are present even before adolescence. Furthermore, if these gender differences are found in a community sample, they might be a normative part of development. Issues such as gender role socialization, menarche, internalizing cognitions, and negative self-esteem were reviewed. Future studies should examine the efficacy of interventions such as learned resourcefulness in preventing depressive symptoms in school-aged girls.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.