Loneliness and Depression in Spousal Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161285
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Loneliness and Depression in Spousal Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease
Abstract:
Loneliness and Depression in Spousal Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Beeson, Rose, DNSc, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, Akron,, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Co-Authors:Carol J. Farran, DNSc, RN, Professor; Sara Horton-Deutsch, DNSc, RN, Associate Professor; Suzanne Perraud, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Marcia M. Neundorfer, PhD, RN, Researcher
Loneliness as a factor in the development of depression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) spousal caregivers has been given little attention. To develop tailored nursing interventions to better meet the mental health needs of (AD) caregivers, nurses must first understand the elements of the caregiver/care-receiver dyadic relationship and the complexities that lead to depressive symptomatology, including the potential relationship between loneliness and depression. Data from a sample of 102 AD spousal caregivers enrolled at a mid-west AD Research Center were analyzed to examine the relationship between loneliness and depression and the relationship each had with the following selected variables: spousal relationship (i.e. husband vs. wife), quality of the past relationship, relational deprivation, patients' depressive symptoms and disruptive behaviors, and quality of the current relationship. The conceptual framework was based on Pearlin, Mullan, Semple and Skaff's (1990) Caregiver Stress Process Model. Computing Pearson r correlations, the results suggested that higher levels of caregiver loneliness were associated with higher levels of caregiver relational deprivation (r=.46, p<.001), higher levels of patients' depressive symptoms (r=.35, p<.01) and disruptive behaviors (r=.34, p<.01), poorer quality of the current relationship (r=.46, p<.001), and higher levels of caregiver depression (r=.62, p<.001). In the prediction of AD caregiver depression, 49% of the variance was explained utilizing stepwise regression. The strongest predictor of AD caregiver depression was loneliness, explaining 39% of the total variance in AD caregiver depression. Patients' depressive symptoms explained 4%, spousal relationship explained 3% and relational deprivation explained 3%. Quality of the past relationship, patients' disruptive behaviors, and quality of the current relationship were not significant predictors. Although certain conditions of the AD caregiver's life are not amenable to change, loneliness is treatable. Future nursing interventions must address loneliness and depression.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLoneliness and Depression in Spousal Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161285-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Loneliness and Depression in Spousal Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beeson, Rose, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Akron,, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol J. Farran, DNSc, RN, Professor; Sara Horton-Deutsch, DNSc, RN, Associate Professor; Suzanne Perraud, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Marcia M. Neundorfer, PhD, RN, Researcher</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Loneliness as a factor in the development of depression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) spousal caregivers has been given little attention. To develop tailored nursing interventions to better meet the mental health needs of (AD) caregivers, nurses must first understand the elements of the caregiver/care-receiver dyadic relationship and the complexities that lead to depressive symptomatology, including the potential relationship between loneliness and depression. Data from a sample of 102 AD spousal caregivers enrolled at a mid-west AD Research Center were analyzed to examine the relationship between loneliness and depression and the relationship each had with the following selected variables: spousal relationship (i.e. husband vs. wife), quality of the past relationship, relational deprivation, patients' depressive symptoms and disruptive behaviors, and quality of the current relationship. The conceptual framework was based on Pearlin, Mullan, Semple and Skaff's (1990) Caregiver Stress Process Model. Computing Pearson r correlations, the results suggested that higher levels of caregiver loneliness were associated with higher levels of caregiver relational deprivation (r=.46, p&lt;.001), higher levels of patients' depressive symptoms (r=.35, p&lt;.01) and disruptive behaviors (r=.34, p&lt;.01), poorer quality of the current relationship (r=.46, p&lt;.001), and higher levels of caregiver depression (r=.62, p&lt;.001). In the prediction of AD caregiver depression, 49% of the variance was explained utilizing stepwise regression. The strongest predictor of AD caregiver depression was loneliness, explaining 39% of the total variance in AD caregiver depression. Patients' depressive symptoms explained 4%, spousal relationship explained 3% and relational deprivation explained 3%. Quality of the past relationship, patients' disruptive behaviors, and quality of the current relationship were not significant predictors. Although certain conditions of the AD caregiver's life are not amenable to change, loneliness is treatable. Future nursing interventions must address loneliness and depression.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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