2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161286
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Neonatal ICU Father Support on Lactation: A Preliminary Study
Abstract:
Impact of Neonatal ICU Father Support on Lactation: A Preliminary Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bernaix, Laura, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 64 Santa Anita Dr, Edwardsville,, IL, 62062-1928 , USA
Co-Authors:Patricia Jamerson, PhD, RN, Nurse Scientist Researcher; Cynthia A. Schmidt, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Joan Smith, MSN, RN, NNP, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner; Lorraine Seiter, BSN, RN, IBCLC, Lactation Consultant; T. R. Carr, PhD, Professor
The provision of breast milk to premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has been associated with decreased infant morbidities and shorter NICU hospital stays. Despite this evidence, mothers of premature babies often do not choose to breastfeed or are unsuccessful in their lactation efforts. These mothers indicate a lack of support from the father of the baby, possibly due to the father's lack of knowledge, misconceptions, and negative attitudes about breastfeeding, as a major barrier. Few studies have examined the significance of father support on the mother's ability to initiate and maintain lactation for the premature infant hospitalized in the NICU, and no studies have tested an intervention geared for the fathers of these infants. The purposes of this pilot study were to examine family management styles of breastfeeding in couples who have a premature infant in the NICU, determine what type of lactation support program would be most desired and helpful for fathers, and to obtain initial psychometric properties of study instruments. The Family Management Style (FMS) conceptual framework is guiding this study. Interviews of 10 mother-father couples who had a hospitalized premature infant in a Midwestern NICU, along with administration of questionnaires designed to measure paternal breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes were conducted. Data analysis, using the constant comparative method for qualitative data and descriptive and psychometric statistics for quantitative data, is currently underway. Results will provide direction for a paternal support program intervention, to be later tested using a randomized, controlled trial. Participation in a NICU paternal lactation support program is anticipated to increase father's involvement and satisfaction with the lactation process, improve mothers' perception of paternal support for lactation, facilitate a FMS supportive of lactation, and increase duration of lactation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Neonatal ICU Father Support on Lactation: A Preliminary Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161286-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Neonatal ICU Father Support on Lactation: A Preliminary Study </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernaix, Laura, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 64 Santa Anita Dr, Edwardsville,, IL, 62062-1928 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia Jamerson, PhD, RN, Nurse Scientist Researcher; Cynthia A. Schmidt, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor; Joan Smith, MSN, RN, NNP, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner; Lorraine Seiter, BSN, RN, IBCLC, Lactation Consultant; T. R. Carr, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The provision of breast milk to premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has been associated with decreased infant morbidities and shorter NICU hospital stays. Despite this evidence, mothers of premature babies often do not choose to breastfeed or are unsuccessful in their lactation efforts. These mothers indicate a lack of support from the father of the baby, possibly due to the father's lack of knowledge, misconceptions, and negative attitudes about breastfeeding, as a major barrier. Few studies have examined the significance of father support on the mother's ability to initiate and maintain lactation for the premature infant hospitalized in the NICU, and no studies have tested an intervention geared for the fathers of these infants. The purposes of this pilot study were to examine family management styles of breastfeeding in couples who have a premature infant in the NICU, determine what type of lactation support program would be most desired and helpful for fathers, and to obtain initial psychometric properties of study instruments. The Family Management Style (FMS) conceptual framework is guiding this study. Interviews of 10 mother-father couples who had a hospitalized premature infant in a Midwestern NICU, along with administration of questionnaires designed to measure paternal breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes were conducted. Data analysis, using the constant comparative method for qualitative data and descriptive and psychometric statistics for quantitative data, is currently underway. Results will provide direction for a paternal support program intervention, to be later tested using a randomized, controlled trial. Participation in a NICU paternal lactation support program is anticipated to increase father's involvement and satisfaction with the lactation process, improve mothers' perception of paternal support for lactation, facilitate a FMS supportive of lactation, and increase duration of lactation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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