2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161289
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Work Schedules, Stressful Life Events, and Sleep Quality in Women
Abstract:
Work Schedules, Stressful Life Events, and Sleep Quality in Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Brown, Pamela, RN, MSN
Contact Address:CON, 5557 Cass, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:Judith A. Floyd, PhD, RN, Professor; Sudarat Chaiarj, RN, MS, Doctoral Candidate, Chiang Mai University
Over 25% of the US workforce is engaged in some form of shift work; nearly half are women. Monk (2000) has suggested that the quality of sleep for women shift workers may be of special concern because of life stress. The major question addressed was: Are women whose work schedules involve day shifts only significantly different regarding life stress and sleep quality from women whose work schedules involve other shifts? The subjects were 476 employed women aged 18-74 (M=43.3, SD=10.6). Sixty-four percent (n=303) of subjects worked day shifts only. Those who worked days only were compared with all other shifts combined. Life stress was measured by the Life Events Checklist (LEC) using unit scoring. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Non-parametric statistics were used whenever variables were not normally distributed. Alpha was set at .05. The number of stressful life events ranged from 0-14 (M=2.3, SD=2.3). The Global PSQI Score ranged from 0-16 (M=6.1, SD=3.1). Poor sleep quality was related to the number of stressful life events, but unrelated to age, Kendall’s taub=.14, p=.000. Work schedules were not related to the number of reported stressful life events, but dayshift-only workers had better sleep quality than those with other work schedules, t(428)=1.76, p=.039. Older subjects reported fewer stressful life events than younger subjects, Kendall’s taub=.10, p=.007. The results of this study of women shift workers support previous research findings that shift workers have lower sleep quality than day workers. Although this sample of women workers had relatively poor sleep quality and stressful life events were correlated with poor sleep quality, the differences in sleep quality in women shift workers was not accounted for by differences in stressful life events. We recommend further studies of women shift-workers that include other explanatory variables and alternate measures of stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWork Schedules, Stressful Life Events, and Sleep Quality in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161289-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Work Schedules, Stressful Life Events, and Sleep Quality in Women </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brown, Pamela, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 5557 Cass, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Floyd, PhD, RN, Professor; Sudarat Chaiarj, RN, MS, Doctoral Candidate, Chiang Mai University</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over 25% of the US workforce is engaged in some form of shift work; nearly half are women. Monk (2000) has suggested that the quality of sleep for women shift workers may be of special concern because of life stress. The major question addressed was: Are women whose work schedules involve day shifts only significantly different regarding life stress and sleep quality from women whose work schedules involve other shifts? The subjects were 476 employed women aged 18-74 (M=43.3, SD=10.6). Sixty-four percent (n=303) of subjects worked day shifts only. Those who worked days only were compared with all other shifts combined. Life stress was measured by the Life Events Checklist (LEC) using unit scoring. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Non-parametric statistics were used whenever variables were not normally distributed. Alpha was set at .05. The number of stressful life events ranged from 0-14 (M=2.3, SD=2.3). The Global PSQI Score ranged from 0-16 (M=6.1, SD=3.1). Poor sleep quality was related to the number of stressful life events, but unrelated to age, Kendall&rsquo;s taub=.14, p=.000. Work schedules were not related to the number of reported stressful life events, but dayshift-only workers had better sleep quality than those with other work schedules, t(428)=1.76, p=.039. Older subjects reported fewer stressful life events than younger subjects, Kendall&rsquo;s taub=.10, p=.007. The results of this study of women shift workers support previous research findings that shift workers have lower sleep quality than day workers. Although this sample of women workers had relatively poor sleep quality and stressful life events were correlated with poor sleep quality, the differences in sleep quality in women shift workers was not accounted for by differences in stressful life events. We recommend further studies of women shift-workers that include other explanatory variables and alternate measures of stress. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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