Personality Variables Predicting to Quality of Life Outcomes in Persons with Dementia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161291
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Personality Variables Predicting to Quality of Life Outcomes in Persons with Dementia
Abstract:
Personality Variables Predicting to Quality of Life Outcomes in Persons with Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Burgener, Sandy, PhD, RNC, FAAN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:CON, 408 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA
Co-Authors:Prudence Twigg, MSN, RNC, Doctoral Student
Using Lawton's conceptualization of quality of life (QoL) in dementia as the guiding framework, 96 persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's, vascular, or mixed dementia and their primary caregiver participated in this 4-year longitudinal study. The mean Mini-Mental Status score was 21.52 for persons with dementia at entry into the study. Forty caregiver/patient pairs remained at 42 months, representing a 58% attrition rate. Two measures were utilized to operationalize personality: the Adult Personality Rating Scale (APRS) and the short-form (60 items) of the NEO-FFI. The APRS was completed in an interview with the caregiver, while the NEO-FFI(s) was completed in an interview with the person with dementia, protecting against a method bias. QoL outcomes were operationalized as psychological well being, depression, functional ability, personal control, and productive behaviors. Data were collected at 6-month intervals using an interview format for a total of 9 data collection points. Controlling for mental status, personality variables predicted to several QoL outcomes throughout the disease process (baseline, 18 months, 42 months), with extroversion predicting to psychological well being and productive behaviors at all three time points. Neuroticism predicted to depression both at baseline and 18 months, with hostility predicting to depression at 42 months. Neuroticism predicted to functional ability at baseline (negative relationship), while hostility predicted to functional ability at 18 months. At 42 months, neuroticism also predicted to (negative relationship) personal control. Collectively, these findings point to the importance of personality in explaining QoL outcomes in persons with dementia, even at the later disease stages, and assist in identifying persons at highest risk for lower QoL.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePersonality Variables Predicting to Quality of Life Outcomes in Persons with Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161291-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Personality Variables Predicting to Quality of Life Outcomes in Persons with Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burgener, Sandy, PhD, RNC, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 408 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Prudence Twigg, MSN, RNC, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Using Lawton's conceptualization of quality of life (QoL) in dementia as the guiding framework, 96 persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's, vascular, or mixed dementia and their primary caregiver participated in this 4-year longitudinal study. The mean Mini-Mental Status score was 21.52 for persons with dementia at entry into the study. Forty caregiver/patient pairs remained at 42 months, representing a 58% attrition rate. Two measures were utilized to operationalize personality: the Adult Personality Rating Scale (APRS) and the short-form (60 items) of the NEO-FFI. The APRS was completed in an interview with the caregiver, while the NEO-FFI(s) was completed in an interview with the person with dementia, protecting against a method bias. QoL outcomes were operationalized as psychological well being, depression, functional ability, personal control, and productive behaviors. Data were collected at 6-month intervals using an interview format for a total of 9 data collection points. Controlling for mental status, personality variables predicted to several QoL outcomes throughout the disease process (baseline, 18 months, 42 months), with extroversion predicting to psychological well being and productive behaviors at all three time points. Neuroticism predicted to depression both at baseline and 18 months, with hostility predicting to depression at 42 months. Neuroticism predicted to functional ability at baseline (negative relationship), while hostility predicted to functional ability at 18 months. At 42 months, neuroticism also predicted to (negative relationship) personal control. Collectively, these findings point to the importance of personality in explaining QoL outcomes in persons with dementia, even at the later disease stages, and assist in identifying persons at highest risk for lower QoL. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:18:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:18:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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