2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161292
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diabetes in Transition: Factors Affecting College Students with Diabetes
Abstract:
Diabetes in Transition: Factors Affecting College Students with Diabetes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Burke, Sandra, MSN, RN
Contact Address:Medical Surgical Nursing, CON, 408 S. Goodwin, MC-076, , Urbana, IL, 61873, USA
Adolescents and young adults often have poor diabetes self-management practices when they enter college and begin independently managing their disease. With Bandura’s Social Cognitive theory providing a framework, the purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to examine selected factors affecting diabetes self-management in older adolescents and young adults living in a college environment. Description of the subjects: English speaking men and women (N=32) with diabetes but otherwise healthy took part in the study. Methods: After informed consent and release of medical records for the most recent glycohemoglobin test were obtained, subjects completed four self-report questionnaires: the General Information Survey (developed for this study to collect demographic and self-management data), the Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT), the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID), and the Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES). If no glycohemoglobin result was available from the previous three months, the subject had that test done at a local lab. Results: Glycohemoglobin levels varied by gender. The mean level was 7.2% (SD 1.29) in men and 8.0% in women (SD 1.26). Mean body mass index was higher in women than men (27.4 vs. 24.3). Most subjects used insulin pump therapy and adjusted insulin doses > 12 times in the past month; 53% monitored glucose levels at least three times daily. Glycohemoglobin levels were not associated with diabetes knowledge (DKT), self-efficacy (DES), or quality of life (PAID), but quality of life was inversely related to self-efficacy. Discussion: Results support previous research that college students have sub-optimal glycemic control (glycohemoglobin levels > 7%) and find diabetes self-management challenging. These data describing patterns of routine self-management strategies in young adults with diabetes may assist clinicians to develop diabetes education and management programs that facilitate improved glycemic control among young adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiabetes in Transition: Factors Affecting College Students with Diabetesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161292-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diabetes in Transition: Factors Affecting College Students with Diabetes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burke, Sandra, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical Surgical Nursing, CON, 408 S. Goodwin, MC-076, , Urbana, IL, 61873, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescents and young adults often have poor diabetes self-management practices when they enter college and begin independently managing their disease. With Bandura&rsquo;s Social Cognitive theory providing a framework, the purpose of this descriptive, correlational study was to examine selected factors affecting diabetes self-management in older adolescents and young adults living in a college environment. Description of the subjects: English speaking men and women (N=32) with diabetes but otherwise healthy took part in the study. Methods: After informed consent and release of medical records for the most recent glycohemoglobin test were obtained, subjects completed four self-report questionnaires: the General Information Survey (developed for this study to collect demographic and self-management data), the Diabetes Knowledge Test (DKT), the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID), and the Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES). If no glycohemoglobin result was available from the previous three months, the subject had that test done at a local lab. Results: Glycohemoglobin levels varied by gender. The mean level was 7.2% (SD 1.29) in men and 8.0% in women (SD 1.26). Mean body mass index was higher in women than men (27.4 vs. 24.3). Most subjects used insulin pump therapy and adjusted insulin doses &gt; 12 times in the past month; 53% monitored glucose levels at least three times daily. Glycohemoglobin levels were not associated with diabetes knowledge (DKT), self-efficacy (DES), or quality of life (PAID), but quality of life was inversely related to self-efficacy. Discussion: Results support previous research that college students have sub-optimal glycemic control (glycohemoglobin levels &gt; 7%) and find diabetes self-management challenging. These data describing patterns of routine self-management strategies in young adults with diabetes may assist clinicians to develop diabetes education and management programs that facilitate improved glycemic control among young adults. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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