2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161299
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Welcoming new employees: A secondary analysis
Abstract:
Welcoming new employees: A secondary analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 8507 Eaglecrest Blvd, San Antonio, TX, 78239, USA
Turnover of employees in their first months of employment is a serious problem for managers. When employees leave before they find out if they fit in the organization, it may be because they feel unwelcome by the staff and leadership. In an earlier study the affective element of welcoming new employees was seen as a key component of effectively integrating new employees during orientation. The affective aspect of orientation has rarely been discussed. A secondary analysis of the qualitative data from the earlier study was done to examine in more depth the social processes of welcoming new nursing employees to an organization. Data available for secondary analysis included transcripts of original interviews (N=36), contact summary sheets, field notes, results of a grounded survey (N=30), original process/ analytic memos and documents. Grounded theory techniques with constant comparative analysis were used to examine the basic social processes of welcoming new nursing employees. Rigor was addressed through use of a new audit trail of process/analytic memos as well as periodic peer-debriefings. Although member-checking with the original informants was not possible, a group of similar nursing personnel from various organizations was assembled to see if the findings “resonated” or “rang true” for the subject area. The organization studied had developed an effective process of welcoming employees after experiencing problems of early turnover. The component parts of this process were identified in the analysis. Themes developed in this study included: Establishing a connection, The videotape that spoke louder than admonishments, Shared Leadership, and Keeping the welcome fresh. Limitations of secondary analysis included lack of theoretic sampling outside the primary data set, the lack of combined and simultaneous collection and analysis of data, and the lack of access to original informants. Methods used to address these limitations will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWelcoming new employees: A secondary analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161299-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Welcoming new employees: A secondary analysis </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Connelly, Lynne, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 8507 Eaglecrest Blvd, San Antonio, TX, 78239, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Turnover of employees in their first months of employment is a serious problem for managers. When employees leave before they find out if they fit in the organization, it may be because they feel unwelcome by the staff and leadership. In an earlier study the affective element of welcoming new employees was seen as a key component of effectively integrating new employees during orientation. The affective aspect of orientation has rarely been discussed. A secondary analysis of the qualitative data from the earlier study was done to examine in more depth the social processes of welcoming new nursing employees to an organization. Data available for secondary analysis included transcripts of original interviews (N=36), contact summary sheets, field notes, results of a grounded survey (N=30), original process/ analytic memos and documents. Grounded theory techniques with constant comparative analysis were used to examine the basic social processes of welcoming new nursing employees. Rigor was addressed through use of a new audit trail of process/analytic memos as well as periodic peer-debriefings. Although member-checking with the original informants was not possible, a group of similar nursing personnel from various organizations was assembled to see if the findings &ldquo;resonated&rdquo; or &ldquo;rang true&rdquo; for the subject area. The organization studied had developed an effective process of welcoming employees after experiencing problems of early turnover. The component parts of this process were identified in the analysis. Themes developed in this study included: Establishing a connection, The videotape that spoke louder than admonishments, Shared Leadership, and Keeping the welcome fresh. Limitations of secondary analysis included lack of theoretic sampling outside the primary data set, the lack of combined and simultaneous collection and analysis of data, and the lack of access to original informants. Methods used to address these limitations will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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