Child Focused-Services: Making a Difference in the Health Promotion Capacity of Single-Parent Families after Leaving an Abusive Partner

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161306
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Child Focused-Services: Making a Difference in the Health Promotion Capacity of Single-Parent Families after Leaving an Abusive Partner
Abstract:
Child Focused-Services: Making a Difference in the Health Promotion Capacity of Single-Parent Families after Leaving an Abusive Partner
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn, PhD, MScN, BScN, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 1151 Richmond St.- H37 HSA, London, ON, N6A 3C1, Canada
Co-Authors:Judith Wuest, PhD, RN, Professor; Marilyn Merritt-Gray, MSN, RN, Associate Professor
Although the process of leaving an abusive partner has been studied, little research has addressed how the new single-parent families created in this process promote their health after leaving, including how broader social systems affect these efforts. Findings of a recent grounded theory study (Wuest et al, 2003) revealed that single-parent families (N=40) engage in health promotion after leaving through a process of Strengthening Capacity to Limit Intrusion in 4 priority areas (regenerating family, nurturing, providing, rebuilding security). Further, services designed to support early childhood development and children’s mental health were found to be key influences affecting this process over time. The purpose of this qualitative, participatory study was to extend the theory of Strengthening Capacity to Limit Intrusion by more fully describing the influence of public policy, as written and enacted, on family health promotion processes after leaving abusive relationships. Using theoretical sampling, policies and programs relevant to family’s concerns for early childhood development and children’s mental health were identified. Structural elements of these services and systems and their influence on family health promotion were explored during indepth, dialogic interviews with 80 front line service providers and policy makers in 2 Canadian provinces in which services and policies varied. Data were analyzed via the constant comparative method. Findings revealed that theoretical elements of child health systems, such as access, eligibility, orientation, priorities, and attention to diversity, profoundly affect families’ ability to promote their health after leaving in each priority area identified in the original theory. A dominant focus on the child outside of the context of the family renders abuse invisible and contributes to a poor fit between services and the policies that drive them, and what families require to support their health promotion efforts. Recommendations for practice and program development, policy change and further research will be identified.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChild Focused-Services: Making a Difference in the Health Promotion Capacity of Single-Parent Families after Leaving an Abusive Partneren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161306-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Child Focused-Services: Making a Difference in the Health Promotion Capacity of Single-Parent Families after Leaving an Abusive Partner </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn, PhD, MScN, BScN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1151 Richmond St.- H37 HSA, London, ON, N6A 3C1, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith Wuest, PhD, RN, Professor; Marilyn Merritt-Gray, MSN, RN, Associate Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although the process of leaving an abusive partner has been studied, little research has addressed how the new single-parent families created in this process promote their health after leaving, including how broader social systems affect these efforts. Findings of a recent grounded theory study (Wuest et al, 2003) revealed that single-parent families (N=40) engage in health promotion after leaving through a process of Strengthening Capacity to Limit Intrusion in 4 priority areas (regenerating family, nurturing, providing, rebuilding security). Further, services designed to support early childhood development and children&rsquo;s mental health were found to be key influences affecting this process over time. The purpose of this qualitative, participatory study was to extend the theory of Strengthening Capacity to Limit Intrusion by more fully describing the influence of public policy, as written and enacted, on family health promotion processes after leaving abusive relationships. Using theoretical sampling, policies and programs relevant to family&rsquo;s concerns for early childhood development and children&rsquo;s mental health were identified. Structural elements of these services and systems and their influence on family health promotion were explored during indepth, dialogic interviews with 80 front line service providers and policy makers in 2 Canadian provinces in which services and policies varied. Data were analyzed via the constant comparative method. Findings revealed that theoretical elements of child health systems, such as access, eligibility, orientation, priorities, and attention to diversity, profoundly affect families&rsquo; ability to promote their health after leaving in each priority area identified in the original theory. A dominant focus on the child outside of the context of the family renders abuse invisible and contributes to a poor fit between services and the policies that drive them, and what families require to support their health promotion efforts. Recommendations for practice and program development, policy change and further research will be identified. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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