2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161308
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Association of staphylococcus aureus with localized chronic wound infection
Abstract:
Association of staphylococcus aureus with localized chronic wound infection
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Gardner, Sue, PhD, RN, CWCN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 320 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121 , USA
Co-Authors:Rita A. Frantz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Charles L. Saltzman, MD, Professor
The purpose of this study was to describe the association of staphylococcus aureus (SA) with localized chronic wound infection and other wound characteristics. Conceptual Framework. Nurses are responsible for the day-to-day monitoring of chronic wounds for localized infection to prevent progression and the need for amputation. Unfortunately, the significance of specific species of bacteria from a wound culture is unclear. For example, the significance of SA has not been thoroughly investigated even though it is the most common organism isolated from chronic wounds. Subjects. Subjects were patients with non-arterial chronic wounds. Methods. Sixty-six non-arterial chronic wounds were cultured using quantitative microbiological procedures of viable wound tissue. Infected wounds were defined as those that contained greater than 1,000,000 organisms of any species per gram of tissue. Subject and wound characteristic data were also collected including type of wound. Results. Twenty-four wounds (36%) had localized infection, while 34 (52%) harbored SA. Of the 24 infected wounds, 13 (54% of 24) were infected because the organism that numbered greater than 1,000,000 organisms per gram of tissue was SA. Moreover, localized infection was significantly greater among wounds that harbored SA regardless of the number of SA than wounds that did not harbor any SA (Fisher's Exact, p=.000). Wounds that harbored SA had a mean of 3.1 different organisms in the wound, while those without SA had a mean of 2.3 different organisms. SA was not significantly associated with ulcer duration or type of ulcer. Conclusions. SA may interact and increase the virulence of other bacterial species in the chronic wound environment. This finding suggests that the isolation of SA from a chronic wound should prompt more vigilant nursing assessment and/or more vigorous nursing interventions to reduce the bacterial burden of the wound. Prospective studies of healing outcomes and SA are needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssociation of staphylococcus aureus with localized chronic wound infectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161308-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Association of staphylococcus aureus with localized chronic wound infection </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gardner, Sue, PhD, RN, CWCN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 320 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rita A. Frantz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Charles L. Saltzman, MD, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to describe the association of staphylococcus aureus (SA) with localized chronic wound infection and other wound characteristics. Conceptual Framework. Nurses are responsible for the day-to-day monitoring of chronic wounds for localized infection to prevent progression and the need for amputation. Unfortunately, the significance of specific species of bacteria from a wound culture is unclear. For example, the significance of SA has not been thoroughly investigated even though it is the most common organism isolated from chronic wounds. Subjects. Subjects were patients with non-arterial chronic wounds. Methods. Sixty-six non-arterial chronic wounds were cultured using quantitative microbiological procedures of viable wound tissue. Infected wounds were defined as those that contained greater than 1,000,000 organisms of any species per gram of tissue. Subject and wound characteristic data were also collected including type of wound. Results. Twenty-four wounds (36%) had localized infection, while 34 (52%) harbored SA. Of the 24 infected wounds, 13 (54% of 24) were infected because the organism that numbered greater than 1,000,000 organisms per gram of tissue was SA. Moreover, localized infection was significantly greater among wounds that harbored SA regardless of the number of SA than wounds that did not harbor any SA (Fisher's Exact, p=.000). Wounds that harbored SA had a mean of 3.1 different organisms in the wound, while those without SA had a mean of 2.3 different organisms. SA was not significantly associated with ulcer duration or type of ulcer. Conclusions. SA may interact and increase the virulence of other bacterial species in the chronic wound environment. This finding suggests that the isolation of SA from a chronic wound should prompt more vigilant nursing assessment and/or more vigorous nursing interventions to reduce the bacterial burden of the wound. Prospective studies of healing outcomes and SA are needed. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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