2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161309
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diagnostic validity of three quantitative swab techniques
Abstract:
Diagnostic validity of three quantitative swab techniques
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Gardner, Sue, PhD, RN, CWCN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 320 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121 , USA
Co-Authors:Rita Frantz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Charles L. Saltzman, MD, Professor
The study aim is to: Identify the most valid quantitative swab technique for identifying localized, soft tissue infection in chronic wounds. Conceptual Framework. Although swab specimens are commonly used to examine the bacteriology of suspicious chronic wounds, the usefulness of the information they provide is unclear. Furthermore, nurses, who collect the majority of swab specimens, are provided conflicting information regarding which collection technique represents best practice. Subjects. Subjects are patients with non-arterial chronic wounds. Methods. To address the study aim, we are examining and comparing the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and accuracy of quantitative cultures derived from swab specimens obtained using 1) wound exudate, 2) Z-technique, and 3) Levine's technique among a sample of infected and non-infected chronic wounds. Quantitative cultures of viable wound tissue are being employed as the gold standard from which to estimate sensitivity and specificity for each of the swab specimens. The limitations of previous studies of swab cultures have been addressed by 1) employing an adequate sample size, 2) delineating and fully describing the swab techniques to be studied and compared, 3) comparing the swab techniques against the gold standard specimen (i.e., biopsy of viable wound tissue), 4) applying a standard, research-based definition of an infected wound, 5) adopting and describing microbiological procedures to enhance recovery and quantification of organisms consistent with this definition, and 6) employing data analysis strategies compatible with addressing diagnostic validity. To date, 70 subjects have completed study procedures. The target enrollment of 140 subjects will provide an accuracy estimate within .05 of the population value with 95% probability. Examination of the accuracy of quantitative swab cultures will clarify their potential role in monitoring chronic wounds for bacterial burden and provide guidance to nurses as to the technique that represents best practice when obtaining swab specimens from wounds.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiagnostic validity of three quantitative swab techniquesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161309-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diagnostic validity of three quantitative swab techniques</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gardner, Sue, PhD, RN, CWCN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 320 NB, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rita Frantz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor; Charles L. Saltzman, MD, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The study aim is to: Identify the most valid quantitative swab technique for identifying localized, soft tissue infection in chronic wounds. Conceptual Framework. Although swab specimens are commonly used to examine the bacteriology of suspicious chronic wounds, the usefulness of the information they provide is unclear. Furthermore, nurses, who collect the majority of swab specimens, are provided conflicting information regarding which collection technique represents best practice. Subjects. Subjects are patients with non-arterial chronic wounds. Methods. To address the study aim, we are examining and comparing the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and accuracy of quantitative cultures derived from swab specimens obtained using 1) wound exudate, 2) Z-technique, and 3) Levine's technique among a sample of infected and non-infected chronic wounds. Quantitative cultures of viable wound tissue are being employed as the gold standard from which to estimate sensitivity and specificity for each of the swab specimens. The limitations of previous studies of swab cultures have been addressed by 1) employing an adequate sample size, 2) delineating and fully describing the swab techniques to be studied and compared, 3) comparing the swab techniques against the gold standard specimen (i.e., biopsy of viable wound tissue), 4) applying a standard, research-based definition of an infected wound, 5) adopting and describing microbiological procedures to enhance recovery and quantification of organisms consistent with this definition, and 6) employing data analysis strategies compatible with addressing diagnostic validity. To date, 70 subjects have completed study procedures. The target enrollment of 140 subjects will provide an accuracy estimate within .05 of the population value with 95% probability. Examination of the accuracy of quantitative swab cultures will clarify their potential role in monitoring chronic wounds for bacterial burden and provide guidance to nurses as to the technique that represents best practice when obtaining swab specimens from wounds. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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