Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161315
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Study
Abstract:
Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Harnirattisai, Teeranut, MSN
Contact Address:Sinclair SON, 316, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Co-Authors:Teeranut Harnirattisai, MSN, Doctoral Candidate; Rebecca, A. Johnson, PhD, RN
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a Behavioral Change Intervention (BCI) on self-efficacy, outcome expectation, physical activity participation, and physical performance of older adults after knee replacement surgery. It used a quasi-experimental design with a pre-posttest control group and a qualitative component. A total of 63 Thai older adults receiving knee replacement surgery who met the inclusion criteria were studied. The experimental and control conditions were randomly introduced by week. The experimental group received a BCI in addition to usual care given by hospital nursing staff. The control group received only usual care given by hospital nursing staff. The BCI, designed based on the Social Cognitive Theory consisted of nurse-patient interaction and discussion, the patients recording their exercise and physical activity, information prompts, and family support of exercise and physical activity. This research was undertaken in two large hospitals in Thailand from July 2002 to March 2003.The Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test were employed to test the mean differences between groups. The experimental group had significantly greater improvements in self-efficacy for exercise, outcome expectations for exercise and functional activity and had significantly greater improvement in physical performance than did the control group at PO week 2 and PO week 6. There was no statistically significant difference in self-efficacy for functional activity. Qualitative data demonstrated that self-regulation seemed to be the most important mechanism for maintaining exercise and physical activity. The findings suggested that the most critical time for intervention is in the first 2 weeks after surgery. Nurses can inform, support and encourage older adults’ exercise and physical activity to maximize physical performance and function.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161315-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exercise, Physical Activity, and Physical Performance in Thai Elders after Knee Replacement Surgery: a Behavioral Change Intervention Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harnirattisai, Teeranut, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair SON, 316, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Teeranut Harnirattisai, MSN, Doctoral Candidate; Rebecca, A. Johnson, PhD, RN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a Behavioral Change Intervention (BCI) on self-efficacy, outcome expectation, physical activity participation, and physical performance of older adults after knee replacement surgery. It used a quasi-experimental design with a pre-posttest control group and a qualitative component. A total of 63 Thai older adults receiving knee replacement surgery who met the inclusion criteria were studied. The experimental and control conditions were randomly introduced by week. The experimental group received a BCI in addition to usual care given by hospital nursing staff. The control group received only usual care given by hospital nursing staff. The BCI, designed based on the Social Cognitive Theory consisted of nurse-patient interaction and discussion, the patients recording their exercise and physical activity, information prompts, and family support of exercise and physical activity. This research was undertaken in two large hospitals in Thailand from July 2002 to March 2003.The Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test were employed to test the mean differences between groups. The experimental group had significantly greater improvements in self-efficacy for exercise, outcome expectations for exercise and functional activity and had significantly greater improvement in physical performance than did the control group at PO week 2 and PO week 6. There was no statistically significant difference in self-efficacy for functional activity. Qualitative data demonstrated that self-regulation seemed to be the most important mechanism for maintaining exercise and physical activity. The findings suggested that the most critical time for intervention is in the first 2 weeks after surgery. Nurses can inform, support and encourage older adults&rsquo; exercise and physical activity to maximize physical performance and function. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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