2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161318
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Theory of Orchestration: An Emerging Mid-Range Theory
Abstract:
Theory of Orchestration: An Emerging Mid-Range Theory
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Herrington, Carolyn, MSN, RN, NNP, RNC
Title:Neonatal Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:Division of Neonatology, 1215 E. Michigan Ave., Lansing, MI, 48910, USA
Critically ill newborns begin life outside the womb under the most adverse of conditions. Continual advances in technology offer hope for survival for infants who would likely have died a decade ago. These technological advances however, alter the natural course of development, thrusting the infant far from patterns experienced within the normal intrauterine milieu, disrupting normal patterns of growth and development for both the infant and family. Nurses in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are in key positions to foster well being for these fragile infants and their families. By incorporating the knowledge gained from this unique vantage point, nurses can play a significant role in patterning the NICU experience to promote negentropy, and foster well being despite these adversities. Pain experienced as a result of these technologies creates one of the most significant deviations from the supportive milieu of the uterus, and the long-term effects of these experiences are beginning to be explored. Rogers’ Science of Unitary Human Beings provides the framework for this emerging mid-range theory named Theory of Orchestration. The theory proposes that nurses foster well being within the NICU through a process of recognizing pattern manifestations, promoting interactions which support the infant’s inherent abilities, and guiding development of appropriate interactions through deliberative patterning where the infant’s well-being is threatened. Pain, and pain relief in the NICU, are judged by a cadre of behavioral and physiologic patterns. By observing the manifestation of patterns in infants nurses are better able to recognize infants experiencing pain, and provide measures to relieve the pain. Manifestation of these patterns, however, is not specific to pain, and can be significantly altered by gestation and illness. This emerging mid-range theory is currently being used to explore additional pattern manifestations to guide research in non-pharmacological pain relief
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTheory of Orchestration: An Emerging Mid-Range Theoryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161318-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Theory of Orchestration: An Emerging Mid-Range Theory</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Herrington, Carolyn, MSN, RN, NNP, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Neonatal Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Division of Neonatology, 1215 E. Michigan Ave., Lansing, MI, 48910, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Critically ill newborns begin life outside the womb under the most adverse of conditions. Continual advances in technology offer hope for survival for infants who would likely have died a decade ago. These technological advances however, alter the natural course of development, thrusting the infant far from patterns experienced within the normal intrauterine milieu, disrupting normal patterns of growth and development for both the infant and family. Nurses in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are in key positions to foster well being for these fragile infants and their families. By incorporating the knowledge gained from this unique vantage point, nurses can play a significant role in patterning the NICU experience to promote negentropy, and foster well being despite these adversities. Pain experienced as a result of these technologies creates one of the most significant deviations from the supportive milieu of the uterus, and the long-term effects of these experiences are beginning to be explored. Rogers&rsquo; Science of Unitary Human Beings provides the framework for this emerging mid-range theory named Theory of Orchestration. The theory proposes that nurses foster well being within the NICU through a process of recognizing pattern manifestations, promoting interactions which support the infant&rsquo;s inherent abilities, and guiding development of appropriate interactions through deliberative patterning where the infant&rsquo;s well-being is threatened. Pain, and pain relief in the NICU, are judged by a cadre of behavioral and physiologic patterns. By observing the manifestation of patterns in infants nurses are better able to recognize infants experiencing pain, and provide measures to relieve the pain. Manifestation of these patterns, however, is not specific to pain, and can be significantly altered by gestation and illness. This emerging mid-range theory is currently being used to explore additional pattern manifestations to guide research in non-pharmacological pain relief </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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