2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161319
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal-Infant Interaction and Intimate Partner Violence in Filipino Mothers
Abstract:
Maternal-Infant Interaction and Intimate Partner Violence in Filipino Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Ilagan, Perla, PhD, RN
Contact Address:27 Allendale, Terre Haute, IN, 47802, USA
Mother-infant interaction in the presence of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Filipino mother-infant dyads living in the Philippines is described in this study. The conceptual framework that guided this study is depicted in Figure 1. A convenience sample of 100 Filipino mother-infant dyads was recruited in Manila, Philippines and assessed for dyadic interactions using the Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale. Associated maternal and infant data were collected for Demographics, Maternal Confidence Questionnaire, Social Support Network Scale, and Abuse Assessment Screen. It was found that Filipino mothers displayed greater cognitive fostering toward taller and heavier infants and less responsive to the distress of heavier infants. In this sample, confidence in the parenting role was not affected by abuse. However, the more support the mothers received and the higher their educational level, the less the abuse. It was found that abused mothers displayed greater socioemotional growth fostering at a significant level and a tendency to attempt more fostering of cognitive development. Infants showed greater responsiveness toward their abused mothers. Overall, 58% of the mothers experienced some type of abuse from their husbands or partners. Regression analyses showed education and social support predicted abuse. Abuse and maternal confidence predicted the infants’ clarity of cues, responsiveness to their mothers, the mothers’ responses to the infants’ distress, and socioemotional and cognitive growth fostering toward their infants. The quality of mother-infant interactions is important to the developmental outcomes for the infant and IPV has been implicated as a detrimental influence on maternal and infant health. Strategies to enhance culturally relevant patterns of interaction need to be developed for this population and abuse assessment screening must become a part of health care for all Filipino women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal-Infant Interaction and Intimate Partner Violence in Filipino Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161319-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal-Infant Interaction and Intimate Partner Violence in Filipino Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ilagan, Perla, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">27 Allendale, Terre Haute, IN, 47802, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mother-infant interaction in the presence of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Filipino mother-infant dyads living in the Philippines is described in this study. The conceptual framework that guided this study is depicted in Figure 1. A convenience sample of 100 Filipino mother-infant dyads was recruited in Manila, Philippines and assessed for dyadic interactions using the Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale. Associated maternal and infant data were collected for Demographics, Maternal Confidence Questionnaire, Social Support Network Scale, and Abuse Assessment Screen. It was found that Filipino mothers displayed greater cognitive fostering toward taller and heavier infants and less responsive to the distress of heavier infants. In this sample, confidence in the parenting role was not affected by abuse. However, the more support the mothers received and the higher their educational level, the less the abuse. It was found that abused mothers displayed greater socioemotional growth fostering at a significant level and a tendency to attempt more fostering of cognitive development. Infants showed greater responsiveness toward their abused mothers. Overall, 58% of the mothers experienced some type of abuse from their husbands or partners. Regression analyses showed education and social support predicted abuse. Abuse and maternal confidence predicted the infants&rsquo; clarity of cues, responsiveness to their mothers, the mothers&rsquo; responses to the infants&rsquo; distress, and socioemotional and cognitive growth fostering toward their infants. The quality of mother-infant interactions is important to the developmental outcomes for the infant and IPV has been implicated as a detrimental influence on maternal and infant health. Strategies to enhance culturally relevant patterns of interaction need to be developed for this population and abuse assessment screening must become a part of health care for all Filipino women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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