Restorative Activities and Attentional Demands and Their Influence on Well-being among Community-Dwelling Elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161320
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Restorative Activities and Attentional Demands and Their Influence on Well-being among Community-Dwelling Elders
Abstract:
Restorative Activities and Attentional Demands and Their Influence on Well-being among Community-Dwelling Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Jansen, Debra, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Adult Health Nursing, 105 Garfield Ave., P.O. Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA
Well-being for many people as they grow older involves maintaining optimal mental, physical, and daily functioning abilities. Two factors described in relation to the Kaplan Attention Restoration Theory can influence well-being for elders: 1) Restorative activities, such as observing nature, which are experiences associated with improved concentration, and feelings of greater energy and refreshment; and 2) attentional demands, which are factors that can overwhelm and fatigue the neural mechanisms responsible for cognitive processes, such as directed attention, thereby interfering with concentration and daily functioning. Examples of attentional demands include physical discomforts and worries. A growing body of literature provides support for the benefits of restorative activities in promoting effective cognitive functioning and mood among college students and women with breast cancer. Little literature exists, however, regarding the effects of restorative activities and attentional demands on mental and physical functioning abilities and other aspects of well-being for elders. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships among restorative activities, attentional demands, and well-being for community-dwelling elders. In this study, well-being refers to perceptions of concentration abilities, health, and depressive symptoms. Data are being collected from 50 community-dwelling elderly men and women using the following instruments: 1) The Restorative Activity Assessment, to measure exposure to and the benefits of restorative activities; and 2) the Attentional Demands Survey, to assess physical-environmental, informational, behavioral, and affective demands for attention. Well-being is being measured along 3 dimensions using the following tools: 1) Attentional Function Index, to assess performance on common activities requiring directed attention; 2) Geriatric Depression Scale; and 3) Self-ratings of health and independence. Data analysis will involve correlational and regression techniques. Information from this study may be useful to researchers and clinicians interested in implementing and testing interventions aimed at promoting well-being, by reducing attentional demands or by providing restorative activities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRestorative Activities and Attentional Demands and Their Influence on Well-being among Community-Dwelling Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161320-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Restorative Activities and Attentional Demands and Their Influence on Well-being among Community-Dwelling Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jansen, Debra, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health Nursing, 105 Garfield Ave., P.O. Box 4004, Eau Claire, WI, 54702-4004, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Well-being for many people as they grow older involves maintaining optimal mental, physical, and daily functioning abilities. Two factors described in relation to the Kaplan Attention Restoration Theory can influence well-being for elders: 1) Restorative activities, such as observing nature, which are experiences associated with improved concentration, and feelings of greater energy and refreshment; and 2) attentional demands, which are factors that can overwhelm and fatigue the neural mechanisms responsible for cognitive processes, such as directed attention, thereby interfering with concentration and daily functioning. Examples of attentional demands include physical discomforts and worries. A growing body of literature provides support for the benefits of restorative activities in promoting effective cognitive functioning and mood among college students and women with breast cancer. Little literature exists, however, regarding the effects of restorative activities and attentional demands on mental and physical functioning abilities and other aspects of well-being for elders. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships among restorative activities, attentional demands, and well-being for community-dwelling elders. In this study, well-being refers to perceptions of concentration abilities, health, and depressive symptoms. Data are being collected from 50 community-dwelling elderly men and women using the following instruments: 1) The Restorative Activity Assessment, to measure exposure to and the benefits of restorative activities; and 2) the Attentional Demands Survey, to assess physical-environmental, informational, behavioral, and affective demands for attention. Well-being is being measured along 3 dimensions using the following tools: 1) Attentional Function Index, to assess performance on common activities requiring directed attention; 2) Geriatric Depression Scale; and 3) Self-ratings of health and independence. Data analysis will involve correlational and regression techniques. Information from this study may be useful to researchers and clinicians interested in implementing and testing interventions aimed at promoting well-being, by reducing attentional demands or by providing restorative activities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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