A comparison of adult men and women’s care exchange patterns with community-dwelling frail elders in a St. Lucian village

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161324
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A comparison of adult men and women’s care exchange patterns with community-dwelling frail elders in a St. Lucian village
Abstract:
A comparison of adult men and women’s care exchange patterns with community-dwelling frail elders in a St. Lucian village
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Kelley, Lisa, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON , 488 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121 , USA
A growing research base of gendered care for community-dwelling frail elders is adding to what we know about the informal elder care systems. This research is often limited to male or female caregivers' perspectives about a relationship with an elder family member. Gendered care at the community level is important to understanding the complexity of elder care. This longitudinal, three-phase community-based ethnographic field research explored, described and built theory to explain elder care in a social context. Using the ethnographic community study method of Arensburg and Kimball (1965), the community context and elders’ status within the community resulted in identification of key elder care variables. These variables provided a range of elder care situations that were used in Phase II to purposively select 14 elder households to conduct the elder care network analysis. Using interviews, participant observation and journaling for a minimum of one week, these elder households identified 226 individuals who assisted them in getting the things they needed to live through provision of at least 483 care activities. In exchange, the frail elders gave the community member caregivers 323 “benefits". Social exchange theory is used to explain the differential patterns of elder care exchange with adult men and women. Implications for theory, research and practice are described.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA comparison of adult men and women’s care exchange patterns with community-dwelling frail elders in a St. Lucian villageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161324-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A comparison of adult men and women&rsquo;s care exchange patterns with community-dwelling frail elders in a St. Lucian village</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kelley, Lisa, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON , 488 Nursing Building, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121 , USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A growing research base of gendered care for community-dwelling frail elders is adding to what we know about the informal elder care systems. This research is often limited to male or female caregivers' perspectives about a relationship with an elder family member. Gendered care at the community level is important to understanding the complexity of elder care. This longitudinal, three-phase community-based ethnographic field research explored, described and built theory to explain elder care in a social context. Using the ethnographic community study method of Arensburg and Kimball (1965), the community context and elders&rsquo; status within the community resulted in identification of key elder care variables. These variables provided a range of elder care situations that were used in Phase II to purposively select 14 elder households to conduct the elder care network analysis. Using interviews, participant observation and journaling for a minimum of one week, these elder households identified 226 individuals who assisted them in getting the things they needed to live through provision of at least 483 care activities. In exchange, the frail elders gave the community member caregivers 323 &ldquo;benefits&quot;. Social exchange theory is used to explain the differential patterns of elder care exchange with adult men and women. Implications for theory, research and practice are described. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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