2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161325
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Negotiating the Journey: Preparing for Childbirth Through Education
Abstract:
Negotiating the Journey: Preparing for Childbirth Through Education
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Koehn, Mary, PhD, ARNP, FACCE
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 1845 Fairmount - Box 41, Wichita, KS, 67260, USA
The purpose of this exploratory study was to generate a grounded theory explaining how childbearing women perceive childbirth education classes for the childbirth experience. Participants: Nine women attending childbirth education classes for the first time participated in the study. Method: The participants were obtained through purposeful and theoretical sampling. Data collection methods included semi-structured interviews, participant observation, and written resources. Tape-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim. Analysis followed Glaser’s (1978) constant comparative method. Results: Analysis revealed the basic social process: Negotiating the Journey. Four core categories were identified: Exploring the Unknown, Making it Real, Sensing Readiness, and Redefining the Journey. Exploring the Unknown consisted of activities during the first two trimesters of pregnancy to build a knowledge base about the childbirth process. Through childbirth education classes, in the third trimester, the participants engaged in defining and clarifying the task of childbearing, or Making it Real. After completion of the classes, participants expressed readiness or Sensing the Readiness. Knowing, confidence, anxiety, control, and decision-making emerged as process indicators with the overall outcome identified as Readiness. During the fourth phase, Redefining the Journey, the participants not only reviewed and integrated their childbirth experiences but also expressed evidence that they had completed tasks of pregnancy and were continuing on the journey to motherhood. Conclusions: This study revealed that, for these women, childbirth education served to assist them in satisfactorily completing developmental tasks associated with pregnancy and allowed them to proceed with achieving the task of maternal identity. This study will be useful in enhancing the evidence that supports the value of childbirth education to pregnant women. Recommendations for future study include researching women who do not attend childbirth education classes, devising a research instrument to measure readiness, and testing of the grounded theory.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNegotiating the Journey: Preparing for Childbirth Through Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161325-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Negotiating the Journey: Preparing for Childbirth Through Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Koehn, Mary, PhD, ARNP, FACCE</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1845 Fairmount - Box 41, Wichita, KS, 67260, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this exploratory study was to generate a grounded theory explaining how childbearing women perceive childbirth education classes for the childbirth experience. Participants: Nine women attending childbirth education classes for the first time participated in the study. Method: The participants were obtained through purposeful and theoretical sampling. Data collection methods included semi-structured interviews, participant observation, and written resources. Tape-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim. Analysis followed Glaser&rsquo;s (1978) constant comparative method. Results: Analysis revealed the basic social process: Negotiating the Journey. Four core categories were identified: Exploring the Unknown, Making it Real, Sensing Readiness, and Redefining the Journey. Exploring the Unknown consisted of activities during the first two trimesters of pregnancy to build a knowledge base about the childbirth process. Through childbirth education classes, in the third trimester, the participants engaged in defining and clarifying the task of childbearing, or Making it Real. After completion of the classes, participants expressed readiness or Sensing the Readiness. Knowing, confidence, anxiety, control, and decision-making emerged as process indicators with the overall outcome identified as Readiness. During the fourth phase, Redefining the Journey, the participants not only reviewed and integrated their childbirth experiences but also expressed evidence that they had completed tasks of pregnancy and were continuing on the journey to motherhood. Conclusions: This study revealed that, for these women, childbirth education served to assist them in satisfactorily completing developmental tasks associated with pregnancy and allowed them to proceed with achieving the task of maternal identity. This study will be useful in enhancing the evidence that supports the value of childbirth education to pregnant women. Recommendations for future study include researching women who do not attend childbirth education classes, devising a research instrument to measure readiness, and testing of the grounded theory.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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