Use of Motivational Techniques by Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Caring for Individuals with Chronic Illnesses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161326
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of Motivational Techniques by Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Caring for Individuals with Chronic Illnesses
Abstract:
Use of Motivational Techniques by Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Caring for Individuals with Chronic Illnesses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Kupka, Nancy , DNSc, MPH, RN
Contact Address:CON, 2421 Jackson Dr, Chicago, IL, 60517, USA
Chronic illnesses are among the most prevalent, costly, and preventable of all health problems. They contribute to long-term-illness, diminish quality of life, and hasten decline of functioning. Reducing complications of most chronic illnesses requires changing behavior, developing self-management competencies, and adherence to treatment recommendations. Structured self-management and behavior change programs have improved outcomes in chronic illnesses. The extent to which practitioners use recommended methods arising from such programs is not known. Purpose: An observational study was done to determine whether or not practitioners use motivational techniques when counseling patients with a chronic illness, to catalogue the types of techniques used, and to identify patterns related to patient characteristics. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework A working model based on several models related to motivational techniques including the Transtheoretical Model for Change and the Motivational Practitioner Model was developed. Methods: A descriptive study using a content analysis guided by Botelho’s (1999) six-step approach was devised to analyze primary and secondary source data from audiotaped or videotaped interactions (25 between NPs and patients and 30 between physicians and patients). Transcripts were evaluated per the stated aims and hypotheses. Results: 37.4% of practitioners used motivational techniques. There was no difference in use between the two groups (X12=0.024 p=0.956). Use of all 9 of the identified motivational techniques was observed, and both groups used the techniques of decisional balance and mutual goal setting. Interpretation was hindered by small sample size. Implications: The impact of the consistent use of motivational techniques on the ultimate improvement in patient health outcomes clearly needs continued study. Issues related to research methodology, education, and clinical practice are presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of Motivational Techniques by Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Caring for Individuals with Chronic Illnessesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161326-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of Motivational Techniques by Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Caring for Individuals with Chronic Illnesses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kupka, Nancy , DNSc, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 2421 Jackson Dr, Chicago, IL, 60517, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chronic illnesses are among the most prevalent, costly, and preventable of all health problems. They contribute to long-term-illness, diminish quality of life, and hasten decline of functioning. Reducing complications of most chronic illnesses requires changing behavior, developing self-management competencies, and adherence to treatment recommendations. Structured self-management and behavior change programs have improved outcomes in chronic illnesses. The extent to which practitioners use recommended methods arising from such programs is not known. Purpose: An observational study was done to determine whether or not practitioners use motivational techniques when counseling patients with a chronic illness, to catalogue the types of techniques used, and to identify patterns related to patient characteristics. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework A working model based on several models related to motivational techniques including the Transtheoretical Model for Change and the Motivational Practitioner Model was developed. Methods: A descriptive study using a content analysis guided by Botelho&rsquo;s (1999) six-step approach was devised to analyze primary and secondary source data from audiotaped or videotaped interactions (25 between NPs and patients and 30 between physicians and patients). Transcripts were evaluated per the stated aims and hypotheses. Results: 37.4% of practitioners used motivational techniques. There was no difference in use between the two groups (X12=0.024 p=0.956). Use of all 9 of the identified motivational techniques was observed, and both groups used the techniques of decisional balance and mutual goal setting. Interpretation was hindered by small sample size. Implications: The impact of the consistent use of motivational techniques on the ultimate improvement in patient health outcomes clearly needs continued study. Issues related to research methodology, education, and clinical practice are presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.