2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161330
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Anxiety and Depression in Taiwanese Cancer Inpatients
Abstract:
Anxiety and Depression in Taiwanese Cancer Inpatients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lin, Ling-Hua, MSN, RN
Contact Address:CON, 400 Nursing Bldg., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA
Literature reported that anxiety and depression were common psychological problems among cancer patients but few related studied were conducted in Taiwan. The aims of this descriptive correlational thesis study were to investigate the levels of anxiety and depression and to examine the correlates of anxiety and depression in Taiwanese cancer inpatients. The Conservation Model provided the conceptual framework. A convenience sample of 187 cancer inpatients were interviewed by the researcher using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and instruments for pain and functional status. With HADS scoring and cut points, the levels of anxiety and depression were respectively 4.63 (SD 3.46) and 7.24 (SD 4.74); the prevalence of probable and definite cases was 20.8% for anxiety and 38.2% for depression. Anxiety level was related to age, functional status, and presence of pain. Depression was associated with educational level, occupational status, family income, current treatment, perceived treatment effect, presence of pain, duration of bearing pain, and functional status. Because a t-test showed a significant difference (p< .05) in functional status between pain and pain-free subjects, a hierarchical multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine the effect of related variables on anxiety and depression. The results revealed that presence of pain, age and functional status were significant predicators of anxiety. Only functional status and perceived treatment effect significantly predicted depression. Contrary to most other studies, the findings in this sample of cancer inpatients indicate that depression is a more severe clinical problem than anxiety. Functional status has a significant effect both on anxiety and depression. Moreover, pain plays a role in predicting anxiety, after controlling for functional status, but not depression. This study provides evidence that anxiety and depression problems exist in Taiwanese cancer inpatients and should be routinely considered in oncology nursing care plans.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnxiety and Depression in Taiwanese Cancer Inpatientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161330-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Anxiety and Depression in Taiwanese Cancer Inpatients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lin, Ling-Hua, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 400 Nursing Bldg., Iowa City, IA, 52242, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Literature reported that anxiety and depression were common psychological problems among cancer patients but few related studied were conducted in Taiwan. The aims of this descriptive correlational thesis study were to investigate the levels of anxiety and depression and to examine the correlates of anxiety and depression in Taiwanese cancer inpatients. The Conservation Model provided the conceptual framework. A convenience sample of 187 cancer inpatients were interviewed by the researcher using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and instruments for pain and functional status. With HADS scoring and cut points, the levels of anxiety and depression were respectively 4.63 (SD 3.46) and 7.24 (SD 4.74); the prevalence of probable and definite cases was 20.8% for anxiety and 38.2% for depression. Anxiety level was related to age, functional status, and presence of pain. Depression was associated with educational level, occupational status, family income, current treatment, perceived treatment effect, presence of pain, duration of bearing pain, and functional status. Because a t-test showed a significant difference (p&lt; .05) in functional status between pain and pain-free subjects, a hierarchical multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine the effect of related variables on anxiety and depression. The results revealed that presence of pain, age and functional status were significant predicators of anxiety. Only functional status and perceived treatment effect significantly predicted depression. Contrary to most other studies, the findings in this sample of cancer inpatients indicate that depression is a more severe clinical problem than anxiety. Functional status has a significant effect both on anxiety and depression. Moreover, pain plays a role in predicting anxiety, after controlling for functional status, but not depression. This study provides evidence that anxiety and depression problems exist in Taiwanese cancer inpatients and should be routinely considered in oncology nursing care plans.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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