2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161335
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Process of Adoptive Parenting
Abstract:
Process of Adoptive Parenting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Luetschwager, Julie, DNSc, RN
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 1423 N. Jefferson Ave, Springfield, MO, 65802, USA
Nurses work closely with biological families as they integrate the infant into the family unit; however, the nurse’s role with adoptive families focuses on caring for the birth mother and the infant being relinquished for adoption. This study seeks to describe the process of adoptive parenting from the perspective of the adoptive parent. An exploratory field design based on grounded theory methodology was used. Sixteen participants, nine women and seven men, all adoptive parents were interviewed using an open-ended format. The substantive theory generated accounted for the process of adoptive parenting and was described through three phases. The Expecting phase was described as the time during which adoptive parents worked through steps in the adoption procedure to attain a child, awaited the arrival of the child, and equipped themselves for the parenting role. In the Connecting phase, adoptive parents demonstrated efforts to form and strengthen the bond with the child while dealing with impacting forces that had a potential to influence bond formation. The Becoming phase was characterized by the recognition of changes in self, relationships, and life in general. The core variable, Transcending Adoption, was described in attitudes and behaviors that helped the adoptive parents rise above and get beyond the challenges they faced in their journey to become parents. Based on qualitative findings, the following conclusions were drawn: The process of adoptive parenting was complex. The phases of adoptive parenting were influenced by the experience of adoption. Adoptive parents face becoming parents with limited information regarding the impact parenting would have on them physically, emotionally, and socially. Adoptive parents viewed hospital staff as either adoption friendly or adoption unfriendly. Adoptive parents were confronted by positive overt acknowledgement of their new identity as parents from others, as well as, comments that covertly illegitimized their new identity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProcess of Adoptive Parentingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161335-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Process of Adoptive Parenting </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Luetschwager, Julie, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 1423 N. Jefferson Ave, Springfield, MO, 65802, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses work closely with biological families as they integrate the infant into the family unit; however, the nurse&rsquo;s role with adoptive families focuses on caring for the birth mother and the infant being relinquished for adoption. This study seeks to describe the process of adoptive parenting from the perspective of the adoptive parent. An exploratory field design based on grounded theory methodology was used. Sixteen participants, nine women and seven men, all adoptive parents were interviewed using an open-ended format. The substantive theory generated accounted for the process of adoptive parenting and was described through three phases. The Expecting phase was described as the time during which adoptive parents worked through steps in the adoption procedure to attain a child, awaited the arrival of the child, and equipped themselves for the parenting role. In the Connecting phase, adoptive parents demonstrated efforts to form and strengthen the bond with the child while dealing with impacting forces that had a potential to influence bond formation. The Becoming phase was characterized by the recognition of changes in self, relationships, and life in general. The core variable, Transcending Adoption, was described in attitudes and behaviors that helped the adoptive parents rise above and get beyond the challenges they faced in their journey to become parents. Based on qualitative findings, the following conclusions were drawn: The process of adoptive parenting was complex. The phases of adoptive parenting were influenced by the experience of adoption. Adoptive parents face becoming parents with limited information regarding the impact parenting would have on them physically, emotionally, and socially. Adoptive parents viewed hospital staff as either adoption friendly or adoption unfriendly. Adoptive parents were confronted by positive overt acknowledgement of their new identity as parents from others, as well as, comments that covertly illegitimized their new identity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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