2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161337
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Accelerated Loss of Function in Breast Cancer Survivors
Abstract:
Accelerated Loss of Function in Breast Cancer Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Mahon, Suzanne, DNSc, RN, AOCN, APNG
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Hematology/Oncology, 3rd Floor West Pavilion, 3655 Vista, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA
Co-Authors:Marietta Caiarelli, MS, RN, NP-C, Nurse Practitioner
Purpose: 210,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer annually. More than 80% are expected to survive at least five years. Aggressive therapies have potential for immediate and long-term effects. This study sought to determine if women who have undergone chemotherapy for breast cancer function less well on normative tests than women who have not undergone treatment. Conceptual Framework: Roy's Adaptation Model of Nursing. Subjects/Method: This ongoing pilot study examined the long-term effects in functional testing in fifteen women, treated for breast cancer at an urban university hospital. Their ages were greater than 45 years (mean age of 57 + 2 years), two or more years after their last chemotherapy, and without signs of recurrent cancer. We compared results of their functional testing to results of the same testing obtained at baseline in an observational study of women without a diagnosis of breast cancer (n=91), age 53.6 years + 6 years. We examined the relationship of age to functional tests results for each test. Tests included time to (a) walk 6meters, (b) rise from a chair and walk 3 meters, (c) open and close a panel of doors, (d) complete a simulated eating test, (e) complete Trails A & B, and (f) the Benton Facial Recognition test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics in Statistica. Results: In each circumstance, the relationship between age and tests results favored the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions: Survivors of breast cancer may be expected to have normal life spans, however, the normal physiologic changes that occur with aging may be accelerated by the long-term effects of chemotherapy, resulting in decreased functioning, a loss of independence, and a decreased quality of life. Nurses can use this information to develop interventions that will mitigate or prevent loss of function and ultimately improve quality of life in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccelerated Loss of Function in Breast Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161337-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Accelerated Loss of Function in Breast Cancer Survivors </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mahon, Suzanne, DNSc, RN, AOCN, APNG</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Hematology/Oncology, 3rd Floor West Pavilion, 3655 Vista, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marietta Caiarelli, MS, RN, NP-C, Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: 210,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer annually. More than 80% are expected to survive at least five years. Aggressive therapies have potential for immediate and long-term effects. This study sought to determine if women who have undergone chemotherapy for breast cancer function less well on normative tests than women who have not undergone treatment. Conceptual Framework: Roy's Adaptation Model of Nursing. Subjects/Method: This ongoing pilot study examined the long-term effects in functional testing in fifteen women, treated for breast cancer at an urban university hospital. Their ages were greater than 45 years (mean age of 57 + 2 years), two or more years after their last chemotherapy, and without signs of recurrent cancer. We compared results of their functional testing to results of the same testing obtained at baseline in an observational study of women without a diagnosis of breast cancer (n=91), age 53.6 years + 6 years. We examined the relationship of age to functional tests results for each test. Tests included time to (a) walk 6meters, (b) rise from a chair and walk 3 meters, (c) open and close a panel of doors, (d) complete a simulated eating test, (e) complete Trails A &amp; B, and (f) the Benton Facial Recognition test. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics in Statistica. Results: In each circumstance, the relationship between age and tests results favored the control group (p&lt;0.01). Conclusions: Survivors of breast cancer may be expected to have normal life spans, however, the normal physiologic changes that occur with aging may be accelerated by the long-term effects of chemotherapy, resulting in decreased functioning, a loss of independence, and a decreased quality of life. Nurses can use this information to develop interventions that will mitigate or prevent loss of function and ultimately improve quality of life in this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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