Gender Disparities in Symptom Attributions and Advice Among Persons Suffering Myocardial Infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161338
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Disparities in Symptom Attributions and Advice Among Persons Suffering Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Gender Disparities in Symptom Attributions and Advice Among Persons Suffering Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Martin, Rene, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, Adult/Gero Area - Room 456, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA
Women suffering myocardial infarction (MI) delay significantly longer than men before seeking treatment after the onset of acute cardiac symptoms, a problem that has been linked to poor post-MI outcomes (for a review, see Dracup et al., 1997). However, little is known about what men and women suffering MI might experience or do differently as they make their decisions to seek care. The purpose of the present study was to explore gender differences in symptom attributions and social interactions during the interval between MI symptom onset and hospital admission. Participants were 157 post-MI patients (109 males; 69%) who were comparable on age, severity of heart disease, medical history, and MI symptom presentation. Participants were interviewed shortly after hospital discharge regarding their perceptions and experiences prior to hospitalization. A smaller proportion of women (27%) vs. men (45%) attributed their symptoms to cardiac causes, c2(1, N=157)=4.45, p=.04. Cox regression analyses indicated that participants who made cardiac (vs. non-cardiac) symptom attributions were faster in deciding to seek treatment, b=.37, c2(1, N=146)=4.06, p=.04. Men and women were equally likely to discuss their symptoms with a support person. However, women were less likely than men to report that a support person had attributed their symptoms to cardiac (vs. non-cardiac) causes, c2(1, N=88)=4.21, p=.04. Women also were less likely than men to have been advised by a support person to seek treatment, c2(1, N=80)=4.60, p=.03. These findings highlight the importance of gender and symptom attributions in understanding MI treatment delay and suggest directions for the development of nursing interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Disparities in Symptom Attributions and Advice Among Persons Suffering Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161338-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Disparities in Symptom Attributions and Advice Among Persons Suffering Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Rene, PhD, RN </td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Adult/Gero Area - Room 456, 50 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA, 52242-1121, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Women suffering myocardial infarction (MI) delay significantly longer than men before seeking treatment after the onset of acute cardiac symptoms, a problem that has been linked to poor post-MI outcomes (for a review, see Dracup et al., 1997). However, little is known about what men and women suffering MI might experience or do differently as they make their decisions to seek care. The purpose of the present study was to explore gender differences in symptom attributions and social interactions during the interval between MI symptom onset and hospital admission. Participants were 157 post-MI patients (109 males; 69%) who were comparable on age, severity of heart disease, medical history, and MI symptom presentation. Participants were interviewed shortly after hospital discharge regarding their perceptions and experiences prior to hospitalization. A smaller proportion of women (27%) vs. men (45%) attributed their symptoms to cardiac causes, c2(1, N=157)=4.45, p=.04. Cox regression analyses indicated that participants who made cardiac (vs. non-cardiac) symptom attributions were faster in deciding to seek treatment, b=.37, c2(1, N=146)=4.06, p=.04. Men and women were equally likely to discuss their symptoms with a support person. However, women were less likely than men to report that a support person had attributed their symptoms to cardiac (vs. non-cardiac) causes, c2(1, N=88)=4.21, p=.04. Women also were less likely than men to have been advised by a support person to seek treatment, c2(1, N=80)=4.60, p=.03. These findings highlight the importance of gender and symptom attributions in understanding MI treatment delay and suggest directions for the development of nursing interventions. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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