2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161341
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transgender Lives and Experiences: A Narrative Inquiry
Abstract:
Transgender Lives and Experiences: A Narrative Inquiry
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Morgan, Sarah, MSN, RN
Contact Address:CON, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Nursing is known as the “caring” profession. Despite this, there are still many people for whom we fail to care. Most nurses lack awareness, knowledge, and comfort with transgendered persons, which can reduce our effectiveness as caregivers. Transgendered is a broad term used to include anyone who transgresses societal norms of gender. This may include female-to-male (FTM) and male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals, cross-dressers, drag queens, drag kings, masculine women, and feminine men. Unfamiliarity with the life experiences of transgendered persons is fueled by their invisibility within nursing literature, textbooks, and clinical experience. This dearth of information leaves nurses poorly prepared for interactions with transgendered persons. In this qualitative study, eleven transgendered adults were interviewed up to three times. The study was approached from a postmodern theoretical perspective in order to best capture the variety of perspectives inherent in participants’ life stories. The method was narrative inquiry in which semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit participants’ experiences with healthcare, relationships with others, development and recognition of a transgendered identity, and bodily experiences. The sample included 5 female-to-males, 5 male-to-females, and 1 cross-dresser. Their ages ranged from 23 to 61 (M=45). Results illustrate transgendered persons’ lifetime struggles for acceptance from early childhood through adulthood. Themes center around childhood experiences of body-mind dissonance, thwarted attempts to express self, bodily betrayal, attempts to conform and resist gender norms, and eventual acceptance of a transgendered self. Along the road to acceptance are numerous losses of dignity, family, friends, and gainful employment. Participants recounted encounters with healthcare, both positive and negative, related to transgender specific care, such as hormones and surgery, as well as general health care needs. Recommendations are given about how nurses can provide sensitive and appropriate care for transgendered persons, and their families, throughout the lifespan.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransgender Lives and Experiences: A Narrative Inquiryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161341-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Transgender Lives and Experiences: A Narrative Inquiry </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Morgan, Sarah, MSN, RN </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing is known as the &ldquo;caring&rdquo; profession. Despite this, there are still many people for whom we fail to care. Most nurses lack awareness, knowledge, and comfort with transgendered persons, which can reduce our effectiveness as caregivers. Transgendered is a broad term used to include anyone who transgresses societal norms of gender. This may include female-to-male (FTM) and male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals, cross-dressers, drag queens, drag kings, masculine women, and feminine men. Unfamiliarity with the life experiences of transgendered persons is fueled by their invisibility within nursing literature, textbooks, and clinical experience. This dearth of information leaves nurses poorly prepared for interactions with transgendered persons. In this qualitative study, eleven transgendered adults were interviewed up to three times. The study was approached from a postmodern theoretical perspective in order to best capture the variety of perspectives inherent in participants&rsquo; life stories. The method was narrative inquiry in which semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit participants&rsquo; experiences with healthcare, relationships with others, development and recognition of a transgendered identity, and bodily experiences. The sample included 5 female-to-males, 5 male-to-females, and 1 cross-dresser. Their ages ranged from 23 to 61 (M=45). Results illustrate transgendered persons&rsquo; lifetime struggles for acceptance from early childhood through adulthood. Themes center around childhood experiences of body-mind dissonance, thwarted attempts to express self, bodily betrayal, attempts to conform and resist gender norms, and eventual acceptance of a transgendered self. Along the road to acceptance are numerous losses of dignity, family, friends, and gainful employment. Participants recounted encounters with healthcare, both positive and negative, related to transgender specific care, such as hormones and surgery, as well as general health care needs. Recommendations are given about how nurses can provide sensitive and appropriate care for transgendered persons, and their families, throughout the lifespan.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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