Primary Health Care of Urban Native Americans Provided in a Center for Nursing Clinic

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161343
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Primary Health Care of Urban Native Americans Provided in a Center for Nursing Clinic
Abstract:
Primary Health Care of Urban Native Americans Provided in a Center for Nursing Clinic
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Neff, Donna, PhD, APRN, BC
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 37 Jefferson Drive, Hudson, OH, 44236, USA
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Kinion, EdD, CNP, FAAN, Professor
The urban Native American population represents a small but very diverse minority that presents with many unique health issues and challenges. The purpose of this retrospective descriptive study was to describe the characteristics of Native Americans who seek primary health care at a center for nursing clinic, the reasons for their visits and a description of care are provided. The conceptual framework for the study was an adaptation of Anderson’s revised Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. Three hundred sixty-three subjects were abstracted from a computerized clinical data set based on the Omaha classification system. Research questions: For Native Americans who sought primary health care at a center for nursing clinic; 1) What were their characteristics?; 2) What were the primary health problems, and; 3) What were the primary nursing interventions? Methodology was descriptive. Results indicated that of the subjects, the ages ranged from 4 to 98 (ì=43; SD=17, yrs of age), the majority were female (n=208; 57 %), single (n=289;80 %), unemployed (n=244 ;67 %), completed education through grade 12 (SD=4.0; 88 %), had yearly incomes less than $11,999 (n=82; 50 %), and uninsured (100 %). One hundred percent of subjects had problems in environmental domain including income and housing problems. The most frequent health problems were related to pain (26%), cardiovascular (24%), dentition (24%) and respiratory (23%). The problems were not exclusive. The primary nursing interventions included; 1) surveillance of physical signs and symptoms (52%); 2) health teaching, guidance and counseling concerning medications (34%), personal care (23%), nutrition (15%); 3) treatment and procedures such as medication disbursement and administration and nebulizer treatments (34%), and; 4) case management of medical and dental follow-up care (19%). In conclusion, center for nursing clinics provide an important primary health care delivery system for vulnerable urban Native Americans.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrimary Health Care of Urban Native Americans Provided in a Center for Nursing Clinicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161343-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Primary Health Care of Urban Native Americans Provided in a Center for Nursing Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Neff, Donna, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 37 Jefferson Drive, Hudson, OH, 44236, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Kinion, EdD, CNP, FAAN, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The urban Native American population represents a small but very diverse minority that presents with many unique health issues and challenges. The purpose of this retrospective descriptive study was to describe the characteristics of Native Americans who seek primary health care at a center for nursing clinic, the reasons for their visits and a description of care are provided. The conceptual framework for the study was an adaptation of Anderson&rsquo;s revised Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. Three hundred sixty-three subjects were abstracted from a computerized clinical data set based on the Omaha classification system. Research questions: For Native Americans who sought primary health care at a center for nursing clinic; 1) What were their characteristics?; 2) What were the primary health problems, and; 3) What were the primary nursing interventions? Methodology was descriptive. Results indicated that of the subjects, the ages ranged from 4 to 98 (&igrave;=43; SD=17, yrs of age), the majority were female (n=208; 57 %), single (n=289;80 %), unemployed (n=244 ;67 %), completed education through grade 12 (SD=4.0; 88 %), had yearly incomes less than $11,999 (n=82; 50 %), and uninsured (100 %). One hundred percent of subjects had problems in environmental domain including income and housing problems. The most frequent health problems were related to pain (26%), cardiovascular (24%), dentition (24%) and respiratory (23%). The problems were not exclusive. The primary nursing interventions included; 1) surveillance of physical signs and symptoms (52%); 2) health teaching, guidance and counseling concerning medications (34%), personal care (23%), nutrition (15%); 3) treatment and procedures such as medication disbursement and administration and nebulizer treatments (34%), and; 4) case management of medical and dental follow-up care (19%). In conclusion, center for nursing clinics provide an important primary health care delivery system for vulnerable urban Native Americans.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.