2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161344
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Every Applicant to Graduate School Really Need the GRE?
Abstract:
Does Every Applicant to Graduate School Really Need the GRE?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 448 O’Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA
Co-Authors:Gary Moore, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Among graduate nursing programs, much discussion has centered on the usefulness of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) in the admissions process. As a result, many schools of nursing have eliminated the GRE requirement. One mid-size midwestern school of nursing wanted empirical data on which to base its decision regarding the necessity of the GRE for all applicants. A descriptive study was undertaken whose primary purpose was to assess the relationship between undergraduate grade point average (UGPA) and GRE scores. A second purpose was to assess whether there was an UGPA above which the GRE would not be required for admission. The Transtheoretical Model of Change (Prochaska & Velicer, 1997) was the conceptual framework used to guide the study. The sample consisted of all currently enrolled nursing graduate students (N=120) at the study institution. The researchers collected data specific to the study’s purposes from each subject’s admission folder. GRE-total scores ranged from 1070 to 1980 (out of a possible 2400). UGPAs ranged from 2.64 to 3.96 on a 4-point scale. Results revealed that the GRE-verbal score was the most predictive of UGPA. A statistically significant difference in GRE-total scores was found at an UGPA of 3.28. The findings of this study lend support to the notion that the GRE is not needed for all nursing applicants to gain entry to graduate school.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoes Every Applicant to Graduate School Really Need the GRE?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161344-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Does Every Applicant to Graduate School Really Need the GRE? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Newton, Sarah, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 448 O&Atilde;&cent;&acirc;&sbquo;&not;&acirc;&bdquo;&cent;Dowd Hall, Rochester, MI, 48309, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gary Moore, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Among graduate nursing programs, much discussion has centered on the usefulness of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) in the admissions process. As a result, many schools of nursing have eliminated the GRE requirement. One mid-size midwestern school of nursing wanted empirical data on which to base its decision regarding the necessity of the GRE for all applicants. A descriptive study was undertaken whose primary purpose was to assess the relationship between undergraduate grade point average (UGPA) and GRE scores. A second purpose was to assess whether there was an UGPA above which the GRE would not be required for admission. The Transtheoretical Model of Change (Prochaska &amp; Velicer, 1997) was the conceptual framework used to guide the study. The sample consisted of all currently enrolled nursing graduate students (N=120) at the study institution. The researchers collected data specific to the study&rsquo;s purposes from each subject&rsquo;s admission folder. GRE-total scores ranged from 1070 to 1980 (out of a possible 2400). UGPAs ranged from 2.64 to 3.96 on a 4-point scale. Results revealed that the GRE-verbal score was the most predictive of UGPA. A statistically significant difference in GRE-total scores was found at an UGPA of 3.28. The findings of this study lend support to the notion that the GRE is not needed for all nursing applicants to gain entry to graduate school. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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