2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161349
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Cost of Being a Patient
Abstract:
The Cost of Being a Patient
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Pfoutz, Susan, PhD, RN
Contact Address:Nursing, 2005 Helen St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA
Co-Authors:Marcia Andersen, PhD, RN, FAAN; Geoffrey Smereck, JD, President; Darlene Mood, PhD, Professor; Jannie Tinsly, MSN, RN, Clinical Services Manager
One purpose of this project, completed by the Well Being Institute, was to examine the costs involved in receiving care for a sample of women diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, mental illness and substance abuse who were lost to medical follow-up. The amount of time women spend receiving health care may affect their willingness to continue in and adhere to care. The conceptual framework for this research was the report of the Panel on Cost Effectiveness in Health and Medicine (Gold et al., 1996). This panel recommends a social perspective for cost-effectiveness analysis that includes the value of patient time spent seeking health care. While the value of patient time in seeking care is not typically examined, these costs could be calculated since transportation to health care resources was one component of nursing model of service integration based on the Personalized LIGHT Model (Andersen, 2002). Detailed service transportation records provide an accurate accounting of time patients spend receiving care from leaving until returning home. A comparative-descriptive design was used to describe the time spent in seeking care for HIV/AIDS, mental health, substance abuse, and other health needs based upon the transportation records compared to self report of health service utilization. The sample included 38 experimental subjects who were recruited through street outreach and clinic referral. To be eligible for the study participants must have verified diagnosis in each of the three categories. Data collection included review of transportation records and self report of service utilization. The value of the time spent receiving this care will be calculated using a lower boundary of the minimum wage and upper boundary of mean income for gender and age.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Cost of Being a Patienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161349-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Cost of Being a Patient </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pfoutz, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 2005 Helen St., Ann Arbor, MI, 48103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marcia Andersen, PhD, RN, FAAN; Geoffrey Smereck, JD, President; Darlene Mood, PhD, Professor; Jannie Tinsly, MSN, RN, Clinical Services Manager </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">One purpose of this project, completed by the Well Being Institute, was to examine the costs involved in receiving care for a sample of women diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, mental illness and substance abuse who were lost to medical follow-up. The amount of time women spend receiving health care may affect their willingness to continue in and adhere to care. The conceptual framework for this research was the report of the Panel on Cost Effectiveness in Health and Medicine (Gold et al., 1996). This panel recommends a social perspective for cost-effectiveness analysis that includes the value of patient time spent seeking health care. While the value of patient time in seeking care is not typically examined, these costs could be calculated since transportation to health care resources was one component of nursing model of service integration based on the Personalized LIGHT Model (Andersen, 2002). Detailed service transportation records provide an accurate accounting of time patients spend receiving care from leaving until returning home. A comparative-descriptive design was used to describe the time spent in seeking care for HIV/AIDS, mental health, substance abuse, and other health needs based upon the transportation records compared to self report of health service utilization. The sample included 38 experimental subjects who were recruited through street outreach and clinic referral. To be eligible for the study participants must have verified diagnosis in each of the three categories. Data collection included review of transportation records and self report of service utilization. The value of the time spent receiving this care will be calculated using a lower boundary of the minimum wage and upper boundary of mean income for gender and age. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:19:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:19:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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