2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161353
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Problem-Solving and Mothers' Competence in Feeding Premature Infants
Abstract:
Family Problem-Solving and Mothers' Competence in Feeding Premature Infants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title:Professor Emerita
Contact Address:SON, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Co-Authors:Michele Schroeder; Janet Melby, PhD, Scientist, Director of Observation Unit; Roger Brown, PhD, Professor
The problem solving that mothers do with family members (i.e., family problem solving) may make a difference for mothers’ caregiving practices. In this study, we explored the effect of family problem-solving competence on mothers’ feeding interaction with their very low birth-weight, premature infants. Family problem-solving competence concerns the quality of processes used by mothers and family members to discuss caregiving issues. This study draws on social contextual theory of competency development (Wozniak & Fischer, 1993). The social context includes family economic resources, estimated with poverty status. Infant biologic condition, as estimated by birth weight, may affect the difficulty of problems to be solved. Participants were 45 mother-family member dyads. Mothers were at least 17 years old and English speaking. Over half (62%) were of minority race/ethnicity. Each mother selected for participation a family member who was involved with her in infant caregiving, for the most part a husband or partner. At 1 and 8 months, infant post-term age, a videotape was made in the home of both a feeding and a 15-minute problem-solving interaction. The Parent-Child Early Relationship Assessment (Clark, 1998) was applied to the feeding interaction to obtain a measure of positive affect and behavior (PAB) and a measure of regulation of negative affect and behavior (RNAB). Interactive problem-solving competencies (solution number, solution quality, effective process, disruptive process, negotiation/compromise) were assessed using Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales (Melby & Conger, 2001). The factor structure of the competency scores will be examined. Fixed occasions analysis (Yang, Heath, & Goldstein, 2000) will be used to explore problem-solving competency effects on PAB and RNAB in the context of poverty status and infant birth weight within and across the two assessments. Results will be examined for implications relevant to interventions to support competency development in both family problem solving and feeding interaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Problem-Solving and Mothers' Competence in Feeding Premature Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161353-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Problem-Solving and Mothers' Competence in Feeding Premature Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor Emerita</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michele Schroeder; Janet Melby, PhD, Scientist, Director of Observation Unit; Roger Brown, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The problem solving that mothers do with family members (i.e., family problem solving) may make a difference for mothers&rsquo; caregiving practices. In this study, we explored the effect of family problem-solving competence on mothers&rsquo; feeding interaction with their very low birth-weight, premature infants. Family problem-solving competence concerns the quality of processes used by mothers and family members to discuss caregiving issues. This study draws on social contextual theory of competency development (Wozniak &amp; Fischer, 1993). The social context includes family economic resources, estimated with poverty status. Infant biologic condition, as estimated by birth weight, may affect the difficulty of problems to be solved. Participants were 45 mother-family member dyads. Mothers were at least 17 years old and English speaking. Over half (62%) were of minority race/ethnicity. Each mother selected for participation a family member who was involved with her in infant caregiving, for the most part a husband or partner. At 1 and 8 months, infant post-term age, a videotape was made in the home of both a feeding and a 15-minute problem-solving interaction. The Parent-Child Early Relationship Assessment (Clark, 1998) was applied to the feeding interaction to obtain a measure of positive affect and behavior (PAB) and a measure of regulation of negative affect and behavior (RNAB). Interactive problem-solving competencies (solution number, solution quality, effective process, disruptive process, negotiation/compromise) were assessed using Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales (Melby &amp; Conger, 2001). The factor structure of the competency scores will be examined. Fixed occasions analysis (Yang, Heath, &amp; Goldstein, 2000) will be used to explore problem-solving competency effects on PAB and RNAB in the context of poverty status and infant birth weight within and across the two assessments. Results will be examined for implications relevant to interventions to support competency development in both family problem solving and feeding interaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.