2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161354
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student Perceptions Surrounding Use of Nutritional Supplements
Abstract:
Student Perceptions Surrounding Use of Nutritional Supplements
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Reising, Deanna, PhD, APRN, BC
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing - Sycamore 405, 1033 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA
Co-Authors:Emily D Brower, BSN Student
Nutritional and herbal supplement use has been well-documented across both high school and college age students. However, perceptions about the circumstances surrounding the use of such supplements is not well understood. Purpose of Study: To determine the perceived benefits and risks of college age student use of nutritional and herbal supplements. Methodology: A descriptive, naturalistic inquiry using content analysis as the data analysis technique. Data Collection: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 70 college age students at a large Midwestern university. Interview questions centered on perceived benefits of the supplements and side effects of the supplements, as well as information about the supplement obtained before use. Data Analysis: Content analysis was performed on the following core questions: 1) Perceived benefits of supplements, 2) side effects experienced from supplements, and 3) prior knowledge of supplement before use. Results: Participants perceived that nutritional and herbal supplements were effective in building muscle mass and strength, increasing endurance and stamina, enhancing overall energy levels, and facilitating weight loss. The most prevalent side effects participants attributed to the use of supplements were increased heart rate, gastrointestinal/flatulence problems, anxiousness and restlessness, hostility, and dehydration. Of the 70 participants, 35 had not obtained information about their supplements outside of reading the supplement label, 28 had obtained information before use, and 7 had obtained information after starting to use the supplement. Many participants reported relying on fellow students for suggestions on which type of supplement to use, and how much of it to use. Conclusions: College student use of supplements is encouraged by peers and information about use of products is based on word of mouth. Students experience a wide range of side effects, some very dangerous. Educational programs are needed about the use of supplements in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudent Perceptions Surrounding Use of Nutritional Supplementsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161354-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Student Perceptions Surrounding Use of Nutritional Supplements </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reising, Deanna, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing - Sycamore 405, 1033 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Emily D Brower, BSN Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nutritional and herbal supplement use has been well-documented across both high school and college age students. However, perceptions about the circumstances surrounding the use of such supplements is not well understood. Purpose of Study: To determine the perceived benefits and risks of college age student use of nutritional and herbal supplements. Methodology: A descriptive, naturalistic inquiry using content analysis as the data analysis technique. Data Collection: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 70 college age students at a large Midwestern university. Interview questions centered on perceived benefits of the supplements and side effects of the supplements, as well as information about the supplement obtained before use. Data Analysis: Content analysis was performed on the following core questions: 1) Perceived benefits of supplements, 2) side effects experienced from supplements, and 3) prior knowledge of supplement before use. Results: Participants perceived that nutritional and herbal supplements were effective in building muscle mass and strength, increasing endurance and stamina, enhancing overall energy levels, and facilitating weight loss. The most prevalent side effects participants attributed to the use of supplements were increased heart rate, gastrointestinal/flatulence problems, anxiousness and restlessness, hostility, and dehydration. Of the 70 participants, 35 had not obtained information about their supplements outside of reading the supplement label, 28 had obtained information before use, and 7 had obtained information after starting to use the supplement. Many participants reported relying on fellow students for suggestions on which type of supplement to use, and how much of it to use. Conclusions: College student use of supplements is encouraged by peers and information about use of products is based on word of mouth. Students experience a wide range of side effects, some very dangerous. Educational programs are needed about the use of supplements in this population. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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