2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161355
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Two Contrasting Cases of HIV-positive, Pregnant Women in Thailand
Abstract:
Two Contrasting Cases of HIV-positive, Pregnant Women in Thailand
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Ross, Ratchneewan, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 338 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Co-Authors:Wilaiphan Sawatphanit, MSN, RN, Assistant Professor; Tatirat Suwansujarid, MSN, RN, Instructor
To understand differing psychological processes between two HIV-positive, pregnant women with contrasting views of their pregnancy. Theoretical Framework: Watson's Human Caring model. Subjects and Method: The narratives of two women who had completed a larger action research study were examined in depth using a case-study method (Stake, 2000). The aim of the larger study was to develop self-esteem among HIV-positive, pregnant women at a prenatal clinic in Thailand. The participants for this study were chosen because of their differing outlooks on their life situations. Participant A was depressed whereas Participant B was self-reliant and happy about her pregnancy. Both received antiviral medicine, prenatal care, counseling, group support, and HIV education. Researchers met each woman 10 times during the year 2000. In-depth, taped-recorded interviews were conducted. Results: Participant A described meeting her husband when she worked as prostitute. After marrying him, she had an affair with another man. Her husband was angry and believed she received the virus from that man. The husband remained HIV-negative. For participant A, the news of her infection was unexpected and she considered an abortion. She decided to keep the baby because of her husband, but was worried she would infect her baby. Participant B received the virus from her husband who had been to prostitutes before marriage. Because he was diagnosed HIV-positive before her pregnancy, her diagnosis was not shocking. She too was fearful of infecting her baby, but remained happy. The major difference between the women's narratives was Participant B's discussion of how she gained willpower. This process will be discussed in depth during the presentation. Conclusions: Understanding a woman's psychological process after learning of her HIV infection is crucial. Nursing care provided for each woman should be according to her own psychological processes and life context.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTwo Contrasting Cases of HIV-positive, Pregnant Women in Thailanden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161355-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Two Contrasting Cases of HIV-positive, Pregnant Women in Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ross, Ratchneewan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 338 Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Wilaiphan Sawatphanit, MSN, RN, Assistant Professor; Tatirat Suwansujarid, MSN, RN, Instructor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To understand differing psychological processes between two HIV-positive, pregnant women with contrasting views of their pregnancy. Theoretical Framework: Watson's Human Caring model. Subjects and Method: The narratives of two women who had completed a larger action research study were examined in depth using a case-study method (Stake, 2000). The aim of the larger study was to develop self-esteem among HIV-positive, pregnant women at a prenatal clinic in Thailand. The participants for this study were chosen because of their differing outlooks on their life situations. Participant A was depressed whereas Participant B was self-reliant and happy about her pregnancy. Both received antiviral medicine, prenatal care, counseling, group support, and HIV education. Researchers met each woman 10 times during the year 2000. In-depth, taped-recorded interviews were conducted. Results: Participant A described meeting her husband when she worked as prostitute. After marrying him, she had an affair with another man. Her husband was angry and believed she received the virus from that man. The husband remained HIV-negative. For participant A, the news of her infection was unexpected and she considered an abortion. She decided to keep the baby because of her husband, but was worried she would infect her baby. Participant B received the virus from her husband who had been to prostitutes before marriage. Because he was diagnosed HIV-positive before her pregnancy, her diagnosis was not shocking. She too was fearful of infecting her baby, but remained happy. The major difference between the women's narratives was Participant B's discussion of how she gained willpower. This process will be discussed in depth during the presentation. Conclusions: Understanding a woman's psychological process after learning of her HIV infection is crucial. Nursing care provided for each woman should be according to her own psychological processes and life context.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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