2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161358
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children's Perceptions of Diabetes Self-Care: A National Survey
Abstract:
Children's Perceptions of Diabetes Self-Care: A National Survey
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Schmidt, Cynthia, PhD, RN
Title:Nurse Educator
Contact Address:SON, 7 Goldenrod Lane, Edwardsville, IL, 62025, USA
Co-Authors:Cynthia Schmidt, PhD, RN, Nurse Educator
Little is known about how children with type 1 diabetes develop the abilities to engage in the daily activities required to maintain their health. Knowledge of the perceptions of children and adolescents regarding diabetes-related self-care will help nurses make judgments about self-care deficits and identify methods of promoting self-care abilities. Using Orem's (2001) Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory as a framework, this descriptive, qualitative study used an online survey to elicit the perceptions of a national sample of children and adolescents. A link to a survey was posted on two websites frequented by parents of children with diabetes. Questions were written based upon the literature and preliminary work by this investigator. Two hundred forty children (some guided by parents) and young adults ranging in age from 3 to 23 years responded to this anonymous, online survey. The qualitative data were analyzed to identify themes consistent with the research objectives and to identify similarities and differences across demographic groups. Results indicated that for the younger children, the “pokes” and dietary restrictions were most difficult for them. Older children and adolescents found dietary restrictions, the necessary interruptions in activities, feeling “different” from their peers, the unpredictability of blood glucose levels regardless of adherence to routines, and the constancy of the demands to be the most difficult aspects of having diabetes. A theme across all age groups was that the support of friends and loved ones was essential to the child’s attitude about diabetes care. Participants identified helpful nurse behaviors as: taking time to teach, giving individualized attention, and providing positive reinforcement. “Nagging” by parents and/or professionals was identified as a negative motivator. This method proved to be an invaluable medium for obtaining children’s perceptions; the information gained will allow the voices of children and adolescents diagnosed with type 1 diabetes to impact care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren's Perceptions of Diabetes Self-Care: A National Surveyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161358-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Children's Perceptions of Diabetes Self-Care: A National Survey </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmidt, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Educator </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 7 Goldenrod Lane, Edwardsville, IL, 62025, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia Schmidt, PhD, RN, Nurse Educator </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little is known about how children with type 1 diabetes develop the abilities to engage in the daily activities required to maintain their health. Knowledge of the perceptions of children and adolescents regarding diabetes-related self-care will help nurses make judgments about self-care deficits and identify methods of promoting self-care abilities. Using Orem's (2001) Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory as a framework, this descriptive, qualitative study used an online survey to elicit the perceptions of a national sample of children and adolescents. A link to a survey was posted on two websites frequented by parents of children with diabetes. Questions were written based upon the literature and preliminary work by this investigator. Two hundred forty children (some guided by parents) and young adults ranging in age from 3 to 23 years responded to this anonymous, online survey. The qualitative data were analyzed to identify themes consistent with the research objectives and to identify similarities and differences across demographic groups. Results indicated that for the younger children, the &ldquo;pokes&rdquo; and dietary restrictions were most difficult for them. Older children and adolescents found dietary restrictions, the necessary interruptions in activities, feeling &ldquo;different&rdquo; from their peers, the unpredictability of blood glucose levels regardless of adherence to routines, and the constancy of the demands to be the most difficult aspects of having diabetes. A theme across all age groups was that the support of friends and loved ones was essential to the child&rsquo;s attitude about diabetes care. Participants identified helpful nurse behaviors as: taking time to teach, giving individualized attention, and providing positive reinforcement. &ldquo;Nagging&rdquo; by parents and/or professionals was identified as a negative motivator. This method proved to be an invaluable medium for obtaining children&rsquo;s perceptions; the information gained will allow the voices of children and adolescents diagnosed with type 1 diabetes to impact care. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.