2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161359
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Focus Groups: Teen Girls and Physical Activity
Abstract:
Focus Groups: Teen Girls and Physical Activity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Schroeder, Ginny, MSN, MA, RN
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:SON, Room 523, 3525 Caroline Mall,, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Co-Authors:Deborah Loman, PhD, RN
Teen girls drastically reduce their physical activity throughout their teens. Once this has happened physical activity is less likely to become part of a woman’s lifestyle. The purpose of this focus group study is to understand teen girls’ perceptions of physical activity and to identify reasons why they do or do not engage in physical activity. This research also will identify factors that may encourage teen girls to become or remain physically active. The researchers will explore the girls’ perceptions of specific interventions and their ideas about new interventions that might help teen girls develop a physically active lifestyle. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory and Prochaska’s Transtheoretical Model of Change provided direction for this study’s development. Subjects: The projected sample size is 24-32 English-speaking teen girls, ages 13-17, from an underserved population in a major urban area. Recruitment is taking place at various health clinics serving this population. Method: The focus groups consist of a small number of girls, grouped by age. Each group has a moderator and a recorder, lasts two hours and is audio-taped. After an initial ice-breaking activity, open-ended questions are used to gather information stated in the purpose. The recordings are being transcribed and content analyzed to identify themes. It is anticipated that data collection will be completed by November 2003. Results: Preliminary findings suggest that teen girls acknowledge the importance of physical activity but assign it a low priority among competing activities. Physical activities that are peer-oriented, interesting, fun, and consume limited time are more likely to be adopted. Analysis is ongoing. Conclusions: The current research will aid in the development of intervention research. Successful interventions to enhance physical activity in teen girls must address its relatively low priority and its time requirements.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFocus Groups: Teen Girls and Physical Activityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161359-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Focus Groups: Teen Girls and Physical Activity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schroeder, Ginny, MSN, MA, RN </td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Room 523, 3525 Caroline Mall,, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Loman, PhD, RN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Teen girls drastically reduce their physical activity throughout their teens. Once this has happened physical activity is less likely to become part of a woman&rsquo;s lifestyle. The purpose of this focus group study is to understand teen girls&rsquo; perceptions of physical activity and to identify reasons why they do or do not engage in physical activity. This research also will identify factors that may encourage teen girls to become or remain physically active. The researchers will explore the girls&rsquo; perceptions of specific interventions and their ideas about new interventions that might help teen girls develop a physically active lifestyle. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: Bandura&rsquo;s Social Cognitive Theory and Prochaska&rsquo;s Transtheoretical Model of Change provided direction for this study&rsquo;s development. Subjects: The projected sample size is 24-32 English-speaking teen girls, ages 13-17, from an underserved population in a major urban area. Recruitment is taking place at various health clinics serving this population. Method: The focus groups consist of a small number of girls, grouped by age. Each group has a moderator and a recorder, lasts two hours and is audio-taped. After an initial ice-breaking activity, open-ended questions are used to gather information stated in the purpose. The recordings are being transcribed and content analyzed to identify themes. It is anticipated that data collection will be completed by November 2003. Results: Preliminary findings suggest that teen girls acknowledge the importance of physical activity but assign it a low priority among competing activities. Physical activities that are peer-oriented, interesting, fun, and consume limited time are more likely to be adopted. Analysis is ongoing. Conclusions: The current research will aid in the development of intervention research. Successful interventions to enhance physical activity in teen girls must address its relatively low priority and its time requirements.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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