Walking and Its Dose-Response Relationship to Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomes in Older Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161360
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Walking and Its Dose-Response Relationship to Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomes in Older Adults
Abstract:
Walking and Its Dose-Response Relationship to Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomes in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Shaver, Patricia, MS, ANP, RN
Contact Address:Cent. Geront. Nsg, SON, 1125 Foothills Road, Sturgis, SD, 57785, USA
Co-Authors:Jean F Wyman, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN, Professor, Jennifer A. Peters; Ruth D. Lindquist
Physical activity benefits older adults through improved health, function, and well-being. Walking is a safe, convenient physical activity for older adults, but research is lacking on the optimal dose of walking to achieve health outcomes. This study examined the effects of a walking program on health-related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes in older adults, and determined whether a dose-response relationship exists between walking and each HRQL outcome. Conceptual Model: A model of HRQL specific to this study is based on Wilson and Cleary (1995) and contains the elements of bodily well-being, physical function, psychosocial function, and overall perceptions of HRQL. Subjects: The sample comprised 86 community-dwelling adults (mean age=75 + 7 S.D.; 87% women; 99% white) involved in a trial comparing exercise adherence interventions. Method: Participants carried out a graded, moderate intensity, 16-week walking program, at least 30 minutes per day, 5 times weekly. Results and Conclusions: Sixty-six percent of participants met or exceeded the total number of minutes of walking expected. Significant improvements were found in gait speed (P=.011) and in level of physical activity as measured by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (P=.003). In general, there were no significant changes on SF-36 Health Survey subscale scores other than worsening of the SF-36 emotional role subscale score (P=.022). Nor was there a post-program change in mood as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale. Analysis of dose-response relationships is being conducted using multiple regression. Overall, the walking program led to improved physical function in older adults, had equivocal results on psychological function, and had no effect on other HRQL measures. The lack of improvement on other HRQL dimensions may represent a ceiling effect produced by this sample’s high baseline HRQL scores.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWalking and Its Dose-Response Relationship to Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomes in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161360-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Walking and Its Dose-Response Relationship to Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomes in Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shaver, Patricia, MS, ANP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Cent. Geront. Nsg, SON, 1125 Foothills Road, Sturgis, SD, 57785, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean F Wyman, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN, Professor, Jennifer A. Peters; Ruth D. Lindquist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Physical activity benefits older adults through improved health, function, and well-being. Walking is a safe, convenient physical activity for older adults, but research is lacking on the optimal dose of walking to achieve health outcomes. This study examined the effects of a walking program on health-related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes in older adults, and determined whether a dose-response relationship exists between walking and each HRQL outcome. Conceptual Model: A model of HRQL specific to this study is based on Wilson and Cleary (1995) and contains the elements of bodily well-being, physical function, psychosocial function, and overall perceptions of HRQL. Subjects: The sample comprised 86 community-dwelling adults (mean age=75 + 7 S.D.; 87% women; 99% white) involved in a trial comparing exercise adherence interventions. Method: Participants carried out a graded, moderate intensity, 16-week walking program, at least 30 minutes per day, 5 times weekly. Results and Conclusions: Sixty-six percent of participants met or exceeded the total number of minutes of walking expected. Significant improvements were found in gait speed (P=.011) and in level of physical activity as measured by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (P=.003). In general, there were no significant changes on SF-36 Health Survey subscale scores other than worsening of the SF-36 emotional role subscale score (P=.022). Nor was there a post-program change in mood as assessed by the Geriatric Depression Scale. Analysis of dose-response relationships is being conducted using multiple regression. Overall, the walking program led to improved physical function in older adults, had equivocal results on psychological function, and had no effect on other HRQL measures. The lack of improvement on other HRQL dimensions may represent a ceiling effect produced by this sample&rsquo;s high baseline HRQL scores.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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