2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161361
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Residential and Care Preferences Among Korean American Elders and Their Children
Abstract:
Residential and Care Preferences Among Korean American Elders and Their Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Shin, Dong-soo, PhD, RN
Contact Address:CON, Seoul, Korea
This ethnographic study explored the residential and care preferences of Korean American elders and their adult children based on the elders’ health status: healthy or bedridden. In addition, Korean American elders and their children’s levels of knowledge about, and use of, six services were identified: assisted living; adult day care; home care programs; respite care; Meals on Wheels; and visiting nurses. Conceptual framework: Lawton’s person-environment fit model. Subjects: Purposive sample of 26 individuals from three residential settings in the Chicago area: Korean nursing homes; senior housing; and co-residence with children. Method: Ethnographic Interviews and participant observation followed by ethnographic analysis of interview data using NVivo. Results: Most of elder participants were old (80 years and over) and poor ( below $6,000 per year). Adult child participants (daughters or daughters-in-law) were employed. None of the participants were recent immigrants. The attitudes toward the three settings yielded thirteen themes in three domains: maintaining control, family concerns, and health service issues. The majority of ambulatory elder participants stated a preference for their current residence. However, if they were to become bedridden, all of the elders expected that they would go to a nursing home against their preferences. For healthy Korean American elders, family harmony, helping their adult children, and personal autonomy were the key factors associated with residential preferences. For the bedridden elders, caregiver availability, public assistance, and elders’ own attitudes toward long-term care services were the main factors. In addition, nearly all participants’ levels of knowledge about formal services were extremely low. Conclusions: Long-term care providers and policy makers should be aware of the foundations of Korean Americans’ elder care preferences. Educational outreach to increase Korean Americans’ knowledge and awareness of community based long-term care services are needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResidential and Care Preferences Among Korean American Elders and Their Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161361-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Residential and Care Preferences Among Korean American Elders and Their Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shin, Dong-soo, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Seoul, Korea</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This ethnographic study explored the residential and care preferences of Korean American elders and their adult children based on the elders&rsquo; health status: healthy or bedridden. In addition, Korean American elders and their children&rsquo;s levels of knowledge about, and use of, six services were identified: assisted living; adult day care; home care programs; respite care; Meals on Wheels; and visiting nurses. Conceptual framework: Lawton&rsquo;s person-environment fit model. Subjects: Purposive sample of 26 individuals from three residential settings in the Chicago area: Korean nursing homes; senior housing; and co-residence with children. Method: Ethnographic Interviews and participant observation followed by ethnographic analysis of interview data using NVivo. Results: Most of elder participants were old (80 years and over) and poor ( below $6,000 per year). Adult child participants (daughters or daughters-in-law) were employed. None of the participants were recent immigrants. The attitudes toward the three settings yielded thirteen themes in three domains: maintaining control, family concerns, and health service issues. The majority of ambulatory elder participants stated a preference for their current residence. However, if they were to become bedridden, all of the elders expected that they would go to a nursing home against their preferences. For healthy Korean American elders, family harmony, helping their adult children, and personal autonomy were the key factors associated with residential preferences. For the bedridden elders, caregiver availability, public assistance, and elders&rsquo; own attitudes toward long-term care services were the main factors. In addition, nearly all participants&rsquo; levels of knowledge about formal services were extremely low. Conclusions: Long-term care providers and policy makers should be aware of the foundations of Korean Americans&rsquo; elder care preferences. Educational outreach to increase Korean Americans&rsquo; knowledge and awareness of community based long-term care services are needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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