Recruitment Strategies and Retention Rates Among Inner-City African-American Women Participating in an Intervention Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161363
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment Strategies and Retention Rates Among Inner-City African-American Women Participating in an Intervention Study
Abstract:
Recruitment Strategies and Retention Rates Among Inner-City African-American Women Participating in an Intervention Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Staffileno, Beth, DNSc, RN,
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Adult Health Nursing - 1056 AAC, 600 S. Paulina Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Lola A. Coke, MSN, RN, CS, Doctoral Student; Steven M. Hollenberg, MD, FACC, Professor; Ann F. Minnick, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Recent attention has been focused on recruiting and retaining minority populations in clinical research studies to help reduce health disparities. Purpose: This report describes recruitment strategies and retention rates for an 11-week lifestyle physical activity intervention currently involving sedentary, hypertension-prone African-American women, aged 18-45. Methods: Active and passive methods were utilized over an 11-month period. Active recruitment (contacting targeted individuals) includes blood pressure screenings, health fairs, and direct referrals. Passive recruitment (informing the community with public notices and waiting for volunteers to call) include posting flyers at work-sites, community colleges, health clinics, beauty salons, churches, food stores, and YMCA; newspaper, radio, and internet advertisements; and talk radio. Results: Of the 76 inquiries received to date, 23 (30%) women were eligible for initial screening and 14 (18 %) women were enrolled into the study. The yield of eligible (ineligible) participants obtained were: flyers 5 (28); advertisements from newspaper 8 (9), radio 0 (1), and internet 1 (2); direct referral 8 (7); blood pressure screenings 1 (0); and 6 unknown. Of the 23 eligible inquiries 50% resulted from newspaper advertisements and 36% were direct referrals. Of the 53 ineligible inquiries, 53% resulted from posted flyers and 17% were from newspaper advertisements. Once randomized, study retention was 93%. Fifty percent of retained participants were recruited using newspaper advertisements. Conclusion: Newspaper advertisements were the most successful strategy for recruiting eligible women. Notable is the high retention rate, especially in a minority population that has been historically challenging from which to recruit and retain study participants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment Strategies and Retention Rates Among Inner-City African-American Women Participating in an Intervention Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161363-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruitment Strategies and Retention Rates Among Inner-City African-American Women Participating in an Intervention Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Staffileno, Beth, DNSc, RN,</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health Nursing - 1056 AAC, 600 S. Paulina Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lola A. Coke, MSN, RN, CS, Doctoral Student; Steven M. Hollenberg, MD, FACC, Professor; Ann F. Minnick, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recent attention has been focused on recruiting and retaining minority populations in clinical research studies to help reduce health disparities. Purpose: This report describes recruitment strategies and retention rates for an 11-week lifestyle physical activity intervention currently involving sedentary, hypertension-prone African-American women, aged 18-45. Methods: Active and passive methods were utilized over an 11-month period. Active recruitment (contacting targeted individuals) includes blood pressure screenings, health fairs, and direct referrals. Passive recruitment (informing the community with public notices and waiting for volunteers to call) include posting flyers at work-sites, community colleges, health clinics, beauty salons, churches, food stores, and YMCA; newspaper, radio, and internet advertisements; and talk radio. Results: Of the 76 inquiries received to date, 23 (30%) women were eligible for initial screening and 14 (18 %) women were enrolled into the study. The yield of eligible (ineligible) participants obtained were: flyers 5 (28); advertisements from newspaper 8 (9), radio 0 (1), and internet 1 (2); direct referral 8 (7); blood pressure screenings 1 (0); and 6 unknown. Of the 23 eligible inquiries 50% resulted from newspaper advertisements and 36% were direct referrals. Of the 53 ineligible inquiries, 53% resulted from posted flyers and 17% were from newspaper advertisements. Once randomized, study retention was 93%. Fifty percent of retained participants were recruited using newspaper advertisements. Conclusion: Newspaper advertisements were the most successful strategy for recruiting eligible women. Notable is the high retention rate, especially in a minority population that has been historically challenging from which to recruit and retain study participants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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