Comparison of Retrospective and Prospective Measurement of Eating Disorder Behaviors in Women with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161364
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Retrospective and Prospective Measurement of Eating Disorder Behaviors in Women with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa
Abstract:
Comparison of Retrospective and Prospective Measurement of Eating Disorder Behaviors in Women with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Stein, Karen, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482 , USA
Co-Authors:Pamela E. Paulson, PhD, Research Scientist; Colleen Corte, PhD, RN
Behavioral symptoms of eating disorders (ED) include binging, purging, food restriction and excessive exercise. ED intervention studies typically rely on retrospective measures to assess change in these behavioral symptoms. However, retrospective recall of ED behaviors is inaccurate. We used Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) methodology to measure ED behaviors in women with anorexia or bulimia. We examined the pattern of correspondence between EMA and the widely-used Eating Disorder Examination (EDE), a four-week retrospective interview. With EMA, target behaviors were recorded immediately after they occurred on a hand-held computer over 30 days. The EDE was administered within 48 hours of EMA completion. Participants (N=13) recorded an average of 31.2 ED behavioral episodes across the measurement period using EMA. No differences in frequency of ED behaviors were found between the first and second half of the EMA measurement period, suggesting that behavioral frequency was not reactive to the methodology. Subjects reported significantly more episodes of bingeing and excessive exercise (paired ts ³ 2.4, ps £.04) and a trend toward more frequent vomiting episodes, when measured by EDE compared to EMA. The lack of correspondence between the EDE and EMA frequency rates raises important questions about reliable measurement of ED behaviors. Results from a subsequent study indicate that, while some ED behaviors may be common and frequent, women with ED also display distinctively different patterns of eating disorder behaviors. For example, some subjects’ exhibit stereotyped behavioral patterns in which binge/purge cycles were recorded at predictable times during the day. Conversely, the ED behaviors exhibited by other subjects showed no predictable time of occurrence or behaviors. These findings indicate that EMA is a viable and reliable approach to the measurement of ED behaviors. Further, specific patterns of ED behaviors can be identified and differential responses to treatment can be explored, leading to more effective treatment of this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Retrospective and Prospective Measurement of Eating Disorder Behaviors in Women with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161364-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Retrospective and Prospective Measurement of Eating Disorder Behaviors in Women with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stein, Karen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Pamela E. Paulson, PhD, Research Scientist; Colleen Corte, PhD, RN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Behavioral symptoms of eating disorders (ED) include binging, purging, food restriction and excessive exercise. ED intervention studies typically rely on retrospective measures to assess change in these behavioral symptoms. However, retrospective recall of ED behaviors is inaccurate. We used Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) methodology to measure ED behaviors in women with anorexia or bulimia. We examined the pattern of correspondence between EMA and the widely-used Eating Disorder Examination (EDE), a four-week retrospective interview. With EMA, target behaviors were recorded immediately after they occurred on a hand-held computer over 30 days. The EDE was administered within 48 hours of EMA completion. Participants (N=13) recorded an average of 31.2 ED behavioral episodes across the measurement period using EMA. No differences in frequency of ED behaviors were found between the first and second half of the EMA measurement period, suggesting that behavioral frequency was not reactive to the methodology. Subjects reported significantly more episodes of bingeing and excessive exercise (paired ts &sup3; 2.4, ps &pound;.04) and a trend toward more frequent vomiting episodes, when measured by EDE compared to EMA. The lack of correspondence between the EDE and EMA frequency rates raises important questions about reliable measurement of ED behaviors. Results from a subsequent study indicate that, while some ED behaviors may be common and frequent, women with ED also display distinctively different patterns of eating disorder behaviors. For example, some subjects&rsquo; exhibit stereotyped behavioral patterns in which binge/purge cycles were recorded at predictable times during the day. Conversely, the ED behaviors exhibited by other subjects showed no predictable time of occurrence or behaviors. These findings indicate that EMA is a viable and reliable approach to the measurement of ED behaviors. Further, specific patterns of ED behaviors can be identified and differential responses to treatment can be explored, leading to more effective treatment of this population. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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