2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161365
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Biopsychosocial Impact of Parental Cancer on School Agers
Abstract:
Biopsychosocial Impact of Parental Cancer on School Agers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Su, Fei-Jiun, MS, RN
Contact Address:CON, 1585 Neil Avenue, 180 Newton Hall, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Co-Authors:Nancy Ryan-Wenger, PhD, RN, Professor and Associate Dean for Research
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Approximately 128,089 children in 1998 had a parent diagnosed with cancer. Parental cancer may be a pervasive stressful event for children, but the impact on children is largely unrecognized. Most research on children’s adjustment to parental cancer lacks a theoretical basis and appropriate comparison groups. How children cope with parental cancer and the effectiveness of their coping strategies is unknown. Other variables that may influence children’s responses are rarely analyzed. Differences between children’s and parents’ perceptions of this phenomenon need to be examined as well. Theoretical framework is an integration of Lazarus’s cognitive appraisal theory of stress and coping, cognitive developmental theory, social/emotional developmental theory, and physiologic stress response theory. The purpose is to characterize the stress-coping process of children ages 7-12 who have a parent with cancer. Methods: Power analysis indicates that a sample of 51 children is needed for this descriptive, cross-sectional design. Children will be recruited from a support group, oncology clinics and the General Clinical Research Center. Reliable and valid instruments completed by parents include a demographic data form, the Child Behavior Checklist/6-18, the School-age Temperament Inventory, and the parent form of the Family Peer Relationship Questionnaire (FPRQ). Children will complete the child form of the FPRQ, Feel Bad Scale, Children’s Coping Strategies Scale, Children’s Stress Symptom Scale and a Human Figure Drawing. Also, Salivary cortisol levels will be analyzed. Analysis will include descriptive statistics, Pearson, eta and canonical correlations to examine relationships, and t-tests and ANOVA to compare groups. Applied significance: Findings will increase our understanding of this pervasive stressor in some children’s lives and will help to identify health outcomes that are amenable to nursing interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBiopsychosocial Impact of Parental Cancer on School Agersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161365-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Biopsychosocial Impact of Parental Cancer on School Agers </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Su, Fei-Jiun, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 1585 Neil Avenue, 180 Newton Hall, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Ryan-Wenger, PhD, RN, Professor and Associate Dean for Research </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Approximately 128,089 children in 1998 had a parent diagnosed with cancer. Parental cancer may be a pervasive stressful event for children, but the impact on children is largely unrecognized. Most research on children&rsquo;s adjustment to parental cancer lacks a theoretical basis and appropriate comparison groups. How children cope with parental cancer and the effectiveness of their coping strategies is unknown. Other variables that may influence children&rsquo;s responses are rarely analyzed. Differences between children&rsquo;s and parents&rsquo; perceptions of this phenomenon need to be examined as well. Theoretical framework is an integration of Lazarus&rsquo;s cognitive appraisal theory of stress and coping, cognitive developmental theory, social/emotional developmental theory, and physiologic stress response theory. The purpose is to characterize the stress-coping process of children ages 7-12 who have a parent with cancer. Methods: Power analysis indicates that a sample of 51 children is needed for this descriptive, cross-sectional design. Children will be recruited from a support group, oncology clinics and the General Clinical Research Center. Reliable and valid instruments completed by parents include a demographic data form, the Child Behavior Checklist/6-18, the School-age Temperament Inventory, and the parent form of the Family Peer Relationship Questionnaire (FPRQ). Children will complete the child form of the FPRQ, Feel Bad Scale, Children&rsquo;s Coping Strategies Scale, Children&rsquo;s Stress Symptom Scale and a Human Figure Drawing. Also, Salivary cortisol levels will be analyzed. Analysis will include descriptive statistics, Pearson, eta and canonical correlations to examine relationships, and t-tests and ANOVA to compare groups. Applied significance: Findings will increase our understanding of this pervasive stressor in some children&rsquo;s lives and will help to identify health outcomes that are amenable to nursing interventions. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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