Incidence of Falls and Risk Factors Associated with Falling in the Homebound Elderly

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161368
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incidence of Falls and Risk Factors Associated with Falling in the Homebound Elderly
Abstract:
Incidence of Falls and Risk Factors Associated with Falling in the Homebound Elderly
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Talley, Kristine, BSN, RN
Contact Address:31805 Elmwood Trail, Stacy, MN, 55079, USA
Co-Authors:Jean F. Wyman, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN, Professor; R.K. Elswick, PhD, Associate Professor; Karen Kirk, MS, RN
Falls are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for older adults but little is known about the risk for homebound elderly. The purposes of this study were to determine: 1) the incidence of falls and fall injuries, 2) the prevalence of key fall risk factors, and 3) which risk factors were associated with falling in the homebound elderly. A secondary analysis was performed on data collected during a 1-year prospective study of falls using a convenience sample of 29 homebound seniors (mean age 79.4, SD±6.74). Subjects received an in-home assessment by a registered nurse, with monthly follow-up through mailed fall calendars or telephone calls. The 1-year fall incidence rate was 55%; with 37% being recurrent fallers; 46.9% of falls resulted in injury, with 6.3% being serious. Single variate logistic regression indicated that three risk factors increased the probability of recurrent falls: a history of recurrent falls (OR=7.58, 95%CI=1.31-43.92, p=.024), a history of any falls (OR=1.86, 95%CI=1.01-3.41, p=.046), and walker use (OR=7.58, 95%CI=1.31 - 43.92, p=.024). Variables with a p<.1 were entered into a multivariate logistic regression model which indicated that a history of recurrent falls was associated with almost a twenty-fold increase in risk for future recurrent falls when performance on timed-chair-stands and fear of falling were held constant (OR=19.31, 95%CI=1.49-249.65, p=.023). In conclusion, falls and fall injuries were prevalent. Most injuries were mild. The serious injury rate for this sample was lower than the rate reported for vigorous elders in other studies, but their fall incidence was higher. The prevalence of most of the fall risk factors was also high, but few risk factors predicted an increased risk for recurrent falls. Although the small convenience sample limits generalizations, it may be that homebound elderly have risk factors for falling that are different from their healthier counterparts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncidence of Falls and Risk Factors Associated with Falling in the Homebound Elderlyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161368-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incidence of Falls and Risk Factors Associated with Falling in the Homebound Elderly</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Talley, Kristine, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">31805 Elmwood Trail, Stacy, MN, 55079, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean F. Wyman, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN, Professor; R.K. Elswick, PhD, Associate Professor; Karen Kirk, MS, RN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Falls are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for older adults but little is known about the risk for homebound elderly. The purposes of this study were to determine: 1) the incidence of falls and fall injuries, 2) the prevalence of key fall risk factors, and 3) which risk factors were associated with falling in the homebound elderly. A secondary analysis was performed on data collected during a 1-year prospective study of falls using a convenience sample of 29 homebound seniors (mean age 79.4, SD&plusmn;6.74). Subjects received an in-home assessment by a registered nurse, with monthly follow-up through mailed fall calendars or telephone calls. The 1-year fall incidence rate was 55%; with 37% being recurrent fallers; 46.9% of falls resulted in injury, with 6.3% being serious. Single variate logistic regression indicated that three risk factors increased the probability of recurrent falls: a history of recurrent falls (OR=7.58, 95%CI=1.31-43.92, p=.024), a history of any falls (OR=1.86, 95%CI=1.01-3.41, p=.046), and walker use (OR=7.58, 95%CI=1.31 - 43.92, p=.024). Variables with a p&lt;.1 were entered into a multivariate logistic regression model which indicated that a history of recurrent falls was associated with almost a twenty-fold increase in risk for future recurrent falls when performance on timed-chair-stands and fear of falling were held constant (OR=19.31, 95%CI=1.49-249.65, p=.023). In conclusion, falls and fall injuries were prevalent. Most injuries were mild. The serious injury rate for this sample was lower than the rate reported for vigorous elders in other studies, but their fall incidence was higher. The prevalence of most of the fall risk factors was also high, but few risk factors predicted an increased risk for recurrent falls. Although the small convenience sample limits generalizations, it may be that homebound elderly have risk factors for falling that are different from their healthier counterparts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.