Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Depression in a Sample of Inner City Adult African Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161373
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Depression in a Sample of Inner City Adult African Americans
Abstract:
Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Depression in a Sample of Inner City Adult African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Washington, Olivia, PhD, APRN, BC, NP, LPC
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:CON, 5216 St. Antoine Street, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Co-Authors:Nancy Artinian, PhD, RN, BC, FAHA; John Flack, MD, Associate Professor; Kai-Lin Cathy Jen, PhD; Jillon Vander Wall, PhD, Assistant Professor; Peter Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, Professor
Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Depression in a Sample of Inner City Adult African Americans Purpose. African Americans, are less likely to report depressive symptoms and receive treatment to alleviate those symptoms. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and extent of depressive symptomology in a sample of 166 urban African Americans with hypertension. Conceptual Framework. The vascular depression theory guided this study. Participants. The volunteer sample included 59 men and 107 women with a mean age of 60 years. The majority of participants were single, unemployed, earned less than 20K per year, and had at least a high school education. Methods. A correlational research design was used. Blood pressure, symptoms of depression (per Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression: CES-D), smoking, body mass index (BMI), and inactivity were measured at baseline and at three months follow-up. Data were collected using structured interviews and physical examinations. Analysis will include descriptives and correlations. Preliminary Findings. Mean baseline blood pressure readings were 158.24 (SD=22.91) mm Hg systolic and 89.32 (SD=14.97) mm Hg diastolic. The systolic reading was consistent with stage 1 hypertension (JNCVII) criteria and the diastolic reading was consistent with JNCVII prehypertension criteria. The mean baseline CES-D score was 16.83 (SD=12.68), with approximately 36% having scores > 16 and 16% having scores > 26, indicating clinical depression levels. A positive relationship was noted between depressive symptoms and diastolic blood pressure readings r=.19, p < .05 and smoking status rpb=.23, p <.01. No significant associations were found between depressive symptoms, diastolic blood pressure readings, BMI, or inactivity. Conclusions. Heightened diastolic blood pressure and smoking appear to be associated with increased depressive symptomology. The next step in this line of research is to determine whether decreases in hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors will result in concurrent decreases in depressive symptomology.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCardiovascular Risk Factors and Depression in a Sample of Inner City Adult African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161373-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Depression in a Sample of Inner City Adult African Americans </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Washington, Olivia, PhD, APRN, BC, NP, LPC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 5216 St. Antoine Street, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Artinian, PhD, RN, BC, FAHA; John Flack, MD, Associate Professor; Kai-Lin Cathy Jen, PhD; Jillon Vander Wall, PhD, Assistant Professor; Peter Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Depression in a Sample of Inner City Adult African Americans Purpose. African Americans, are less likely to report depressive symptoms and receive treatment to alleviate those symptoms. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and extent of depressive symptomology in a sample of 166 urban African Americans with hypertension. Conceptual Framework. The vascular depression theory guided this study. Participants. The volunteer sample included 59 men and 107 women with a mean age of 60 years. The majority of participants were single, unemployed, earned less than 20K per year, and had at least a high school education. Methods. A correlational research design was used. Blood pressure, symptoms of depression (per Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression: CES-D), smoking, body mass index (BMI), and inactivity were measured at baseline and at three months follow-up. Data were collected using structured interviews and physical examinations. Analysis will include descriptives and correlations. Preliminary Findings. Mean baseline blood pressure readings were 158.24 (SD=22.91) mm Hg systolic and 89.32 (SD=14.97) mm Hg diastolic. The systolic reading was consistent with stage 1 hypertension (JNCVII) criteria and the diastolic reading was consistent with JNCVII prehypertension criteria. The mean baseline CES-D score was 16.83 (SD=12.68), with approximately 36% having scores &gt; 16 and 16% having scores &gt; 26, indicating clinical depression levels. A positive relationship was noted between depressive symptoms and diastolic blood pressure readings r=.19, p &lt; .05 and smoking status rpb=.23, p &lt;.01. No significant associations were found between depressive symptoms, diastolic blood pressure readings, BMI, or inactivity. Conclusions. Heightened diastolic blood pressure and smoking appear to be associated with increased depressive symptomology. The next step in this line of research is to determine whether decreases in hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors will result in concurrent decreases in depressive symptomology. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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