Tailored Computerized Symptom Education for Cancer Patients: Effects on Their Misconceptions, Pain and Fatigue Intensity and Satisfaction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161374
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tailored Computerized Symptom Education for Cancer Patients: Effects on Their Misconceptions, Pain and Fatigue Intensity and Satisfaction
Abstract:
Tailored Computerized Symptom Education for Cancer Patients: Effects on Their Misconceptions, Pain and Fatigue Intensity and Satisfaction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Wilkie, Diana, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title:Professor & Harriet Werley Endowed Chair
Contact Address:Medical Surgical Nursing - College of Nursing (MC802), 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Hsiu-Ying Huang, PhD, RN, AOCN, Research Assistant Professor; Hsien-Tzu Chen, PhC, RN, Research Assistant; Anna Schwartz, ARNP, FAAN, Research Associate Professor; Donna Berry, PhD, RN, AOCN, Associate Professor; Mr. Shiping Zong, Senior Research Speciali
Pain and fatigue significantly affects the 1.2 million Americans diagnosed annually with cancer. Many barriers contribute to inadequate symptom management, including patients’ misconceptions about pain and lack of interventions for fatigue. The computer-age offers new strategies for providing time-efficient and effective education to cancer patients. In this study we compared effects of usual care and SymptomReport/SymptomUCope (computerized, patient-centered programs) on misconceptions, pain and fatigue intensity, and satisfaction. Based on the Johnson Behavioral System Model, the SymptomReport/SymptomUCope program was designed as a way to role model patient education. Focused on patients' self-protection and achievement needs, computer-generated, multimedia education was tailored to the patients' beliefs and symptom levels. In a 4-week, pre-test/post-test randomized trial, 230 cancer patients (mean age 52+13 years, 63% female, 90% Caucasian) completed SymptomReportIt, an interactive, touch screen program developed from the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Schwartz Cancer Fatigue Scale, and pain Barriers Questionnaire, all valid and reliable measures. Usual care patients then played computer games (control group) and experimental group patients viewed a computer-generated tailored, multimedia education program, SymptomUCope, an intervention that addressed safe use of analgesics, talking to clinicians about pain, and use of exercise to reduce fatigue. ANCOVA and logistic regression techniques were used to assess group post-test effects controlling for pre-test values. SymptomUCope patients reported significantly lower pain barriers (p<01), lower worst pain intensity scores (p<.05), lower fatigue intensity scores (p<.03). Trends were for the usual care group to be 1.6 times more dissatisfied with their pain and fatigue intensity than the SymptomUCope group. Our findings show that the computer-based, multimedia education programs are feasible in cancer patients. These encouraging findings warrant additional research in minority groups and to assess the mechanisms and clinical utility of these innovative tools and determine the cost-effectiveness of nurses providing the symptom education versus the tailored, computer generated education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTailored Computerized Symptom Education for Cancer Patients: Effects on Their Misconceptions, Pain and Fatigue Intensity and Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161374-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Tailored Computerized Symptom Education for Cancer Patients: Effects on Their Misconceptions, Pain and Fatigue Intensity and Satisfaction </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilkie, Diana, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Harriet Werley Endowed Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical Surgical Nursing - College of Nursing (MC802), 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hsiu-Ying Huang, PhD, RN, AOCN, Research Assistant Professor; Hsien-Tzu Chen, PhC, RN, Research Assistant; Anna Schwartz, ARNP, FAAN, Research Associate Professor; Donna Berry, PhD, RN, AOCN, Associate Professor; Mr. Shiping Zong, Senior Research Speciali</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain and fatigue significantly affects the 1.2 million Americans diagnosed annually with cancer. Many barriers contribute to inadequate symptom management, including patients&rsquo; misconceptions about pain and lack of interventions for fatigue. The computer-age offers new strategies for providing time-efficient and effective education to cancer patients. In this study we compared effects of usual care and SymptomReport/SymptomUCope (computerized, patient-centered programs) on misconceptions, pain and fatigue intensity, and satisfaction. Based on the Johnson Behavioral System Model, the SymptomReport/SymptomUCope program was designed as a way to role model patient education. Focused on patients' self-protection and achievement needs, computer-generated, multimedia education was tailored to the patients' beliefs and symptom levels. In a 4-week, pre-test/post-test randomized trial, 230 cancer patients (mean age 52+13 years, 63% female, 90% Caucasian) completed SymptomReportIt, an interactive, touch screen program developed from the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Schwartz Cancer Fatigue Scale, and pain Barriers Questionnaire, all valid and reliable measures. Usual care patients then played computer games (control group) and experimental group patients viewed a computer-generated tailored, multimedia education program, SymptomUCope, an intervention that addressed safe use of analgesics, talking to clinicians about pain, and use of exercise to reduce fatigue. ANCOVA and logistic regression techniques were used to assess group post-test effects controlling for pre-test values. SymptomUCope patients reported significantly lower pain barriers (p&lt;01), lower worst pain intensity scores (p&lt;.05), lower fatigue intensity scores (p&lt;.03). Trends were for the usual care group to be 1.6 times more dissatisfied with their pain and fatigue intensity than the SymptomUCope group. Our findings show that the computer-based, multimedia education programs are feasible in cancer patients. These encouraging findings warrant additional research in minority groups and to assess the mechanisms and clinical utility of these innovative tools and determine the cost-effectiveness of nurses providing the symptom education versus the tailored, computer generated education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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