2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161377
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reports of Depressive Symptoms in Elders with Chronic Conditions
Abstract:
Reports of Depressive Symptoms in Elders with Chronic Conditions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RNC
Title:Associate Dean and Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA
Co-Authors:Diana Morris, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; Sunida Preechawong, PhD(c), RN; Hsiu-Ju Chang, PhD Candidate, MSN, RN
Depression is the most common mental disorder among older adults in the United States and one of the most disabling conditions among elders worldwide. The development and increasing severity of chronic conditions coupled with psychosocial losses predispose elders to depression. Assessment of late-life depression is complicated by the absence of measures that capture the range of depressive emotions commonly expressed by elders. Incomplete assessment and lack of help-seeking for depression contribute to the growing prevalence of late-life depression. This cross-sectional, descriptive study of 314 chronically ill elders in retirement communities examined the measurement of depressive symptoms using the CES-D, CES-D short form, and an Emotional Symptom Checklist, and their help-seeking patterns for depressive emotions. Mean scores on both forms of the CES-D were significantly correlated (r=.94, p< .01). However, cut-off scores for these measures indicated very few depressive symptoms. Yet, on average, these elders reported two negative emotions with about 29% of them reporting sadness or loneliness. The findings also showed that elders most likely used self-help strategies when feeling sad, lonely, or unhappy, were far less likely to seek help from informal (family, friends) or formal (health professional) sources. The results suggest the need for cautious interpretation of prevalence estimates for late-life depression and conscientious assessment of depressive symptoms that extends beyond relying on established measures and incorporates a wider range of negative emotions. A more concentrated effort toward education and encouragement of elders to seek treatment for depressive symptoms is recommended.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReports of Depressive Symptoms in Elders with Chronic Conditionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161377-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reports of Depressive Symptoms in Elders with Chronic Conditions </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diana Morris, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Professor; Sunida Preechawong, PhD(c), RN; Hsiu-Ju Chang, PhD Candidate, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression is the most common mental disorder among older adults in the United States and one of the most disabling conditions among elders worldwide. The development and increasing severity of chronic conditions coupled with psychosocial losses predispose elders to depression. Assessment of late-life depression is complicated by the absence of measures that capture the range of depressive emotions commonly expressed by elders. Incomplete assessment and lack of help-seeking for depression contribute to the growing prevalence of late-life depression. This cross-sectional, descriptive study of 314 chronically ill elders in retirement communities examined the measurement of depressive symptoms using the CES-D, CES-D short form, and an Emotional Symptom Checklist, and their help-seeking patterns for depressive emotions. Mean scores on both forms of the CES-D were significantly correlated (r=.94, p&lt; .01). However, cut-off scores for these measures indicated very few depressive symptoms. Yet, on average, these elders reported two negative emotions with about 29% of them reporting sadness or loneliness. The findings also showed that elders most likely used self-help strategies when feeling sad, lonely, or unhappy, were far less likely to seek help from informal (family, friends) or formal (health professional) sources. The results suggest the need for cautious interpretation of prevalence estimates for late-life depression and conscientious assessment of depressive symptoms that extends beyond relying on established measures and incorporates a wider range of negative emotions. A more concentrated effort toward education and encouragement of elders to seek treatment for depressive symptoms is recommended. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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