2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161379
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rituals and Rules in the Wheat Valley Assisted Living Culture
Abstract:
Rituals and Rules in the Wheat Valley Assisted Living Culture
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Al Omari, Hasan, RN, BS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Mail Stop 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:(913) 588-4535
Co-Authors:Kelli Kramer, RN, MS, Predoctoral Student; Carla Hronek, RN, MS, Predoctoral Student; and Veronica F. Rempusheski, RN, PhD, FAAN, Associate Professor
Despite the increasing interest in the concept of assisted living (AL)
as a home like environment for elders, very little is known about the
culture of AL. The purpose of this study was to describe the culture at
one AL facility and to capture the knowledge people use to organize and
interpret their behavior and the behavior of others. An ethnographic
approach was used to elicit and analyze stories and behaviors of residents
and staff at the facility. The data collection process included formal and
informal interviews with residents, family, and staff, participant
observation, and document review. Six cultural categories emerged from the
data analysis. Two categories describe the facility rules: formal and
informal; two categories describe the facility norms: staff as family and
shared values; and two categories describes the facility rituals: private
and public. Implications for nursing practice include strategies for
development of nursesÆ roles as culture brokers, elder advocates, change
agents, and critical thinkers in the AL environment. Conclusions from this
study suggest that nurses are in the key position to translate basic
elements of the AL culture to residents, families, and the public. They
also need to assist policy-makers in setting standards, rules and
regulations for AL. Future research suggestions include exploring,
describing and explaining factors that enhance nursesÆ performance in each
of the roles.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRituals and Rules in the Wheat Valley Assisted Living Cultureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161379-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rituals and Rules in the Wheat Valley Assisted Living Culture</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Al Omari, Hasan, RN, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Mail Stop 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(913) 588-4535</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hal-omari@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kelli Kramer, RN, MS, Predoctoral Student; Carla Hronek, RN, MS, Predoctoral Student; and Veronica F. Rempusheski, RN, PhD, FAAN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the increasing interest in the concept of assisted living (AL) <br/> as a home like environment for elders, very little is known about the <br/> culture of AL. The purpose of this study was to describe the culture at <br/> one AL facility and to capture the knowledge people use to organize and <br/> interpret their behavior and the behavior of others. An ethnographic <br/> approach was used to elicit and analyze stories and behaviors of residents <br/> and staff at the facility. The data collection process included formal and <br/> informal interviews with residents, family, and staff, participant <br/> observation, and document review. Six cultural categories emerged from the <br/> data analysis. Two categories describe the facility rules: formal and <br/> informal; two categories describe the facility norms: staff as family and <br/> shared values; and two categories describes the facility rituals: private <br/> and public. Implications for nursing practice include strategies for <br/> development of nurses&AElig; roles as culture brokers, elder advocates, change <br/> agents, and critical thinkers in the AL environment. Conclusions from this <br/> study suggest that nurses are in the key position to translate basic <br/> elements of the AL culture to residents, families, and the public. They <br/> also need to assist policy-makers in setting standards, rules and <br/> regulations for AL. Future research suggestions include exploring, <br/> describing and explaining factors that enhance nurses&AElig; performance in each <br/> of the roles.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.