Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Attendance on Social Support for Exercise, Motivation, and Self-Efficacy for Exercise after Cardiac Events

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161380
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Attendance on Social Support for Exercise, Motivation, and Self-Efficacy for Exercise after Cardiac Events
Abstract:
Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Attendance on Social Support for Exercise, Motivation, and Self-Efficacy for Exercise after Cardiac Events
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Al-Duhoun, Ahmad, PhD, MSc
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:Nursing Department, 10900 Euclide Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Contact Telephone:216 368 5983
Co-Authors:Shirley M. Moore, PhD, FAAN, RN, Professor
Cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRPs) are a multifaceted approach to
facilitate recovery from cardiac events and assist patients in achieving
long term exercise. The optimal length of a CRP required to achieve
desirable health behavior outcomes has not yet been identified. Thus, the
purpose of this secondary analysis study was to determine the effect of
the number of CRP sessions attended on social support for exercise,
motivation, and self-efficacy for exercise of patients at 2 and 12 months
following completion of a CRP. This study consisted of a descriptive
correlational, longitudinal design using the Social Problem Solving Model
(Ewart, 1990) as a conceptual framework. The sample was comprised of 99
patients (64 men, 35 women) who had a cardiac event. Data were collected
using interviews during the subjectsÆ 8th week in a CRP and at 2 and 12
months following CRP. Standardized instruments were used to measure social
support, motivation and self-efficacy. Results revealed that there were no
significant associations between cardiac rehabilitation session attendance
and family social support for exercise, motivation, and self-efficacy for
exercise. A significant association was found between CRP sessions
attended and friend social support, indicating that subjects who attended
CRP sessions experienced less social support from friends at 12 months.
The number of CRP sessions attended was the highest significant predictor
of friend social support (Beta = - .30), with cardiac functional status and
fitness also being significant predictors. It is clear that a large part
of the variance in friend social support is not accounted for and further
specification of the model is needed. These findings suggest that,
although the 12-week CRP may be of necessary length for reconditioning
after a cardiac event, the length of a CRP may not be justified to
increase social support, motivation, and self-efficacy for long term
exercise.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Attendance on Social Support for Exercise, Motivation, and Self-Efficacy for Exercise after Cardiac Eventsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161380-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Attendance on Social Support for Exercise, Motivation, and Self-Efficacy for Exercise after Cardiac Events</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Al-Duhoun, Ahmad, PhD, MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing Department, 10900 Euclide Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216 368 5983</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aha7@cwru.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Shirley M. Moore, PhD, FAAN, RN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRPs) are a multifaceted approach to <br/> facilitate recovery from cardiac events and assist patients in achieving <br/> long term exercise. The optimal length of a CRP required to achieve <br/> desirable health behavior outcomes has not yet been identified. Thus, the <br/> purpose of this secondary analysis study was to determine the effect of <br/> the number of CRP sessions attended on social support for exercise, <br/> motivation, and self-efficacy for exercise of patients at 2 and 12 months <br/> following completion of a CRP. This study consisted of a descriptive <br/> correlational, longitudinal design using the Social Problem Solving Model <br/> (Ewart, 1990) as a conceptual framework. The sample was comprised of 99 <br/> patients (64 men, 35 women) who had a cardiac event. Data were collected <br/> using interviews during the subjects&AElig; 8th week in a CRP and at 2 and 12 <br/> months following CRP. Standardized instruments were used to measure social <br/> support, motivation and self-efficacy. Results revealed that there were no <br/> significant associations between cardiac rehabilitation session attendance <br/> and family social support for exercise, motivation, and self-efficacy for <br/> exercise. A significant association was found between CRP sessions <br/> attended and friend social support, indicating that subjects who attended <br/> CRP sessions experienced less social support from friends at 12 months. <br/> The number of CRP sessions attended was the highest significant predictor <br/> of friend social support (Beta = - .30), with cardiac functional status and <br/> fitness also being significant predictors. It is clear that a large part <br/> of the variance in friend social support is not accounted for and further <br/> specification of the model is needed. These findings suggest that, <br/> although the 12-week CRP may be of necessary length for reconditioning <br/> after a cardiac event, the length of a CRP may not be justified to <br/> increase social support, motivation, and self-efficacy for long term <br/> exercise.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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