2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161381
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of Health Status among an Urban Homeless Population
Abstract:
Perceptions of Health Status among an Urban Homeless Population
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Anthony, Jean, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Mental Health Nursing, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:(513) 558-5239
Since the city of Cincinnati's last population survey in 1986, the
numbers of homeless individuals has more than doubled to an estimated
24,488. As the numbers of homeless persons increases the conditions that
bring people into homelessness such as poverty, poor health, limited
access and perceived discrimination continue to expand. PURPOSE: The
purpose of this study is to examine urban homeless persons' perceptions of
their health status and to describe how those perceptions affect their
health care experiences. Over 50% of the homeless state that health is the
most important factor in their homelessness, yet many avoid seeking health
care because of past experiences and perceptions that they were treated
with disrespect and insensitivity. As a result, minor illnesses often go
untreated until they develop into major emergencies requiring expensive
medical treatment. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: The framework for this study is
Pender's Health Promotion Model, which describes the health promoting
habits and patterns of individuals through factors such as importance of
health, perceived health status, ease of access and availability of health
promoting options. SUBJECTS: A convenience sample of 150 adult,
self-identified homeless persons will be recruited for participation in
the study. METHOD: Participants will be asked to provide demographic
information, and to complete the Health Perceptions Questionnaire (Ware,
1976), a 32-item, questionnaire which assesses the individuals'
perceptions of their health status. The data will be analyzed using a
series of between subjects ANOVAs. RESULTS and CONCLUSIONS: The results of
this study will assist nurses and other allied health professionals,
delivering care to the homeless, to recognize and develop strategies to
eliminate factors which prevent utilization of health care services. All
data collection and analyses will be completed by December, 2004.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of Health Status among an Urban Homeless Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161381-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of Health Status among an Urban Homeless Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anthony, Jean, PhD, MSN, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mental Health Nursing, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(513) 558-5239</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Jean.Anthony@UC.EDU</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Since the city of Cincinnati's last population survey in 1986, the <br/> numbers of homeless individuals has more than doubled to an estimated <br/> 24,488. As the numbers of homeless persons increases the conditions that <br/> bring people into homelessness such as poverty, poor health, limited <br/> access and perceived discrimination continue to expand. PURPOSE: The <br/> purpose of this study is to examine urban homeless persons' perceptions of <br/> their health status and to describe how those perceptions affect their <br/> health care experiences. Over 50% of the homeless state that health is the <br/> most important factor in their homelessness, yet many avoid seeking health <br/> care because of past experiences and perceptions that they were treated <br/> with disrespect and insensitivity. As a result, minor illnesses often go <br/> untreated until they develop into major emergencies requiring expensive <br/> medical treatment. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: The framework for this study is <br/> Pender's Health Promotion Model, which describes the health promoting <br/> habits and patterns of individuals through factors such as importance of <br/> health, perceived health status, ease of access and availability of health <br/> promoting options. SUBJECTS: A convenience sample of 150 adult, <br/> self-identified homeless persons will be recruited for participation in <br/> the study. METHOD: Participants will be asked to provide demographic <br/> information, and to complete the Health Perceptions Questionnaire (Ware, <br/> 1976), a 32-item, questionnaire which assesses the individuals' <br/> perceptions of their health status. The data will be analyzed using a <br/> series of between subjects ANOVAs. RESULTS and CONCLUSIONS: The results of <br/> this study will assist nurses and other allied health professionals, <br/> delivering care to the homeless, to recognize and develop strategies to <br/> eliminate factors which prevent utilization of health care services. All <br/> data collection and analyses will be completed by December, 2004.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.