Personality Hardiness and Threat Appraisal in Family Caregivers of Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161391
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Personality Hardiness and Threat Appraisal in Family Caregivers of Cancer Patients
Abstract:
Personality Hardiness and Threat Appraisal in Family Caregivers of Cancer Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:McKinney, Melody
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 749 Chestnut Street, SN 316, Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA
Contact Telephone:812.237.3485
Certain caregivers of cancer patients may be at risk for health disturbances because of insufficient personality resources to manage caregiving stressors. Lazarus' stress theory is used to examine relationships among hardiness, threat appraisal, and selected demographic and situational variables in family members caring for patients with a variety of cancers. A secondary analysis is planned on data obtained from three smaller studies that used cross-sectional descriptive, correlational designs and analysis of variance. The combined sample consists of 74 family caregivers of patients receiving treatment at four outpatient oncology centers in Indiana and Michigan. As part of the original studies, subjects completed Oberst's Threat Appraisal Subscale (1991) along with the Control and Commitment/Challenge Subscales that comprise Pollock's Health-Related Hardiness Scale (1990). Data collected on the demographic and situational variables of caregiver age, educational status, gender, length of time caregiving, and type of patient cancer are also included. The purpose of the analysis is to determine whether caregiver threat appraisal is predicted by personality hardiness, and more specifically, the extent to which the hardiness attributes of perceived control and commitment/challenge contribute to threat prediction. Additionally, caregivers high and low in personality hardiness will be compared in relation to the level of threat experienced. Demographic and situational variables significantly related to hardiness and threat will also be examined. Findings will be reflected back to a basic premise of cognitive-stress theory: personality resources (e.g., hardiness) may lessen or prevent stress appraisal. If personality hardiness is a stress-resistance resource that lessens or helps prevent emotional and/or physical health disturbances, then caregivers low in hardiness are at greater risk for such disturbances. Nurses are in a unique position to identify caregivers low in personality hardiness, anticipate stress-producing situations, and provide timely intervention to help prevent health deterioration in this vulnerable group of care providers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePersonality Hardiness and Threat Appraisal in Family Caregivers of Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161391-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Personality Hardiness and Threat Appraisal in Family Caregivers of Cancer Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McKinney, Melody</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 749 Chestnut Street, SN 316, Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812.237.3485</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m-mckinney@indstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Certain caregivers of cancer patients may be at risk for health disturbances because of insufficient personality resources to manage caregiving stressors. Lazarus' stress theory is used to examine relationships among hardiness, threat appraisal, and selected demographic and situational variables in family members caring for patients with a variety of cancers. A secondary analysis is planned on data obtained from three smaller studies that used cross-sectional descriptive, correlational designs and analysis of variance. The combined sample consists of 74 family caregivers of patients receiving treatment at four outpatient oncology centers in Indiana and Michigan. As part of the original studies, subjects completed Oberst's Threat Appraisal Subscale (1991) along with the Control and Commitment/Challenge Subscales that comprise Pollock's Health-Related Hardiness Scale (1990). Data collected on the demographic and situational variables of caregiver age, educational status, gender, length of time caregiving, and type of patient cancer are also included. The purpose of the analysis is to determine whether caregiver threat appraisal is predicted by personality hardiness, and more specifically, the extent to which the hardiness attributes of perceived control and commitment/challenge contribute to threat prediction. Additionally, caregivers high and low in personality hardiness will be compared in relation to the level of threat experienced. Demographic and situational variables significantly related to hardiness and threat will also be examined. Findings will be reflected back to a basic premise of cognitive-stress theory: personality resources (e.g., hardiness) may lessen or prevent stress appraisal. If personality hardiness is a stress-resistance resource that lessens or helps prevent emotional and/or physical health disturbances, then caregivers low in hardiness are at greater risk for such disturbances. Nurses are in a unique position to identify caregivers low in personality hardiness, anticipate stress-producing situations, and provide timely intervention to help prevent health deterioration in this vulnerable group of care providers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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