Use of a Mechanical Rocking-Bed to Decrease Symptoms of Withdrawal in Drug-Exposed Infants: a Time Series Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161394
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of a Mechanical Rocking-Bed to Decrease Symptoms of Withdrawal in Drug-Exposed Infants: a Time Series Analysis
Abstract:
Use of a Mechanical Rocking-Bed to Decrease Symptoms of Withdrawal in Drug-Exposed Infants: a Time Series Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:D'Apolito, Karen
P.I. Institution Name:Vanderbilt University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 111 Godchaux Hall, 2201 West End Avenue, Nashville, TN, 37235, USA
Contact Telephone:615.343.2682
The standard episodic evaluation of data at specific time points within a study does not allow for the identification of cyclic patterns that may provide more meaningful study results. This presentation describes the reanalysis of data using time series analysis in drug-exposed infants who were treated with rocking-bed therapy during the acute period of withdrawal. The infants had been exposed to methadone, heroin, ethanol, marijuana and nicotine. The rocking-bed study was conducted using a repeated measures experimental design and a sample of 14 infants. Infants were randomized into two groups; 7 in the experimental group received 96 hours of rocking-bed therapy over a 7-day period and 7 in the control group were kept in a standard nursery bassinet. Withdrawal symptoms were assessed using the Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System Tool. Scoring began when the infants were 2 hours of age, then every 3 hours thereafter for 10 days. ANOVA was used to determine group differences in relation to the infant's average daily withdrawal score with infants in the experimental group statistically having more symptoms of withdrawal. Results suggested that the use of a mechanical rocking-bed might be too stimulating for drug-exposed infants. Data (1,120 points) were re-examined using time series analysis. The statistical model predicted an increase in symptoms prior to rocking-bed therapy; a decrease in symptoms while the infants received the therapy, and an increase in symptoms when the therapy was discontinued after the 7th day of life. The model also predicted that infants in the standard nursery bassinet would demonstrate a continued increase in symptoms over time. Analysis of these data using the time series statistical model demonstrated both daily and weekly cycles in the infants' responses in both groups. It is important to use time series analysis in infant research due to the cyclical nature of infant responses
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of a Mechanical Rocking-Bed to Decrease Symptoms of Withdrawal in Drug-Exposed Infants: a Time Series Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161394-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Use of a Mechanical Rocking-Bed to Decrease Symptoms of Withdrawal in Drug-Exposed Infants: a Time Series Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">D'Apolito, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vanderbilt University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 111 Godchaux Hall, 2201 West End Avenue, Nashville, TN, 37235, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">615.343.2682</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karen.dapolito@vanderbilt.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The standard episodic evaluation of data at specific time points within a study does not allow for the identification of cyclic patterns that may provide more meaningful study results. This presentation describes the reanalysis of data using time series analysis in drug-exposed infants who were treated with rocking-bed therapy during the acute period of withdrawal. The infants had been exposed to methadone, heroin, ethanol, marijuana and nicotine. The rocking-bed study was conducted using a repeated measures experimental design and a sample of 14 infants. Infants were randomized into two groups; 7 in the experimental group received 96 hours of rocking-bed therapy over a 7-day period and 7 in the control group were kept in a standard nursery bassinet. Withdrawal symptoms were assessed using the Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System Tool. Scoring began when the infants were 2 hours of age, then every 3 hours thereafter for 10 days. ANOVA was used to determine group differences in relation to the infant's average daily withdrawal score with infants in the experimental group statistically having more symptoms of withdrawal. Results suggested that the use of a mechanical rocking-bed might be too stimulating for drug-exposed infants. Data (1,120 points) were re-examined using time series analysis. The statistical model predicted an increase in symptoms prior to rocking-bed therapy; a decrease in symptoms while the infants received the therapy, and an increase in symptoms when the therapy was discontinued after the 7th day of life. The model also predicted that infants in the standard nursery bassinet would demonstrate a continued increase in symptoms over time. Analysis of these data using the time series statistical model demonstrated both daily and weekly cycles in the infants' responses in both groups. It is important to use time series analysis in infant research due to the cyclical nature of infant responses</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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