Effect of Exercise Training and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Functional Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161402
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Exercise Training and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Functional Outcomes
Abstract:
Effect of Exercise Training and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Functional Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Schneider, Joanne, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314.577.8937
The fundamental propositions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are consistent with the self-regulation of exercise maintenance model: Cognitive activity affects behavior and may be monitored and altered, and cognitive change may affect behavior change. Thus, if CBT enhances exercise behavior, functional outcomes also should improve. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that CBT will improve functional outcomes in older adults. The initial cohort of participants was recruited (N=25, age=70.3±3.9, range 64-78; 24 White; 20 females) and randomly assigned to a CBT (n=6), attention-control (n=9), or control group (n=10). After physical and cognitive screening, all participants received exercise training three times/week for two weeks, then one time/week for eight weeks. While exercise training was held constant across groups, the experimental group received CBT and the attention-control group received health promotion education during the eight weekly sessions. The control group only received exercise training. After the 10 weeks of exercise training and the intervention, all participants were encouraged to continue exercising on their own. A nurse practitioner, blinded to groups, measured functional outcomes at baseline and six months later. The CBT group was more fit at baseline than the other two groups. All three groups improved in their functional measures except on the back-scratch test. The CBT group improved slightly more than the other two groups on the 30-second chair-stand test and the chair sit-and-reach test. The CBT and attention-control groups improved similarly on the arm-curl test. The CBT group improved the least on the 8-ft up-and-go and worsened on the back-scratch test. These findings indicate that the exercise training is generally effective. However, the shoulder and arm stretching exercise training was examined and refined. Additional cohorts are needed before making conclusions about the effectiveness of CBT.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Exercise Training and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Functional Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161402-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Exercise Training and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Functional Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schneider, Joanne, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314.577.8937</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schneijk@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The fundamental propositions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are consistent with the self-regulation of exercise maintenance model: Cognitive activity affects behavior and may be monitored and altered, and cognitive change may affect behavior change. Thus, if CBT enhances exercise behavior, functional outcomes also should improve. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that CBT will improve functional outcomes in older adults. The initial cohort of participants was recruited (N=25, age=70.3&plusmn;3.9, range 64-78; 24 White; 20 females) and randomly assigned to a CBT (n=6), attention-control (n=9), or control group (n=10). After physical and cognitive screening, all participants received exercise training three times/week for two weeks, then one time/week for eight weeks. While exercise training was held constant across groups, the experimental group received CBT and the attention-control group received health promotion education during the eight weekly sessions. The control group only received exercise training. After the 10 weeks of exercise training and the intervention, all participants were encouraged to continue exercising on their own. A nurse practitioner, blinded to groups, measured functional outcomes at baseline and six months later. The CBT group was more fit at baseline than the other two groups. All three groups improved in their functional measures except on the back-scratch test. The CBT group improved slightly more than the other two groups on the 30-second chair-stand test and the chair sit-and-reach test. The CBT and attention-control groups improved similarly on the arm-curl test. The CBT group improved the least on the 8-ft up-and-go and worsened on the back-scratch test. These findings indicate that the exercise training is generally effective. However, the shoulder and arm stretching exercise training was examined and refined. Additional cohorts are needed before making conclusions about the effectiveness of CBT.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.