2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161405
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Surrogate Decision-Making at the End of Life
Abstract:
Family Surrogate Decision-Making at the End of Life
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Meeker, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:University at Buffalo at SUNY
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1010 Kimball Tower, South Campus, Buffalo, NY, 14214-3079, USA
Contact Telephone:716.829.2486
This study is investigating decision-making experiences and the basic social process(es) of family members who have been involved in end of life (EOL) decisions with or for a terminally ill family member. Whether because of limited capacity on the part of the patient or because ill persons most frequently involve their significant others in these very salient decisions, EOL decision-making usually involves family member surrogate decision-makers. The primary aims of this research are to: (1) describe family surrogates' experiences with, perceptions of, and strategies used in EOL decision-making; and (2) explain the process used to make EOL decisions. The grounded theory method will be used for sample selection, data collection, and data analysis. Data will be collected in individual interviews and two focus group interviews. Approximately 26 - 32 participants will be needed. A verification focus group will also be conducted. Persons meeting study criteria will be interviewed not sooner than one month following the patient's death. Data will be analyzed using the constant comparative method. The findings will assist nurses to protect the autonomy of patients and to respond to and meet the needs of family member surrogate decision-makers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Surrogate Decision-Making at the End of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161405-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Surrogate Decision-Making at the End of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meeker, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University at Buffalo at SUNY</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1010 Kimball Tower, South Campus, Buffalo, NY, 14214-3079, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">716.829.2486</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">meeker@acsu.buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study is investigating decision-making experiences and the basic social process(es) of family members who have been involved in end of life (EOL) decisions with or for a terminally ill family member. Whether because of limited capacity on the part of the patient or because ill persons most frequently involve their significant others in these very salient decisions, EOL decision-making usually involves family member surrogate decision-makers. The primary aims of this research are to: (1) describe family surrogates' experiences with, perceptions of, and strategies used in EOL decision-making; and (2) explain the process used to make EOL decisions. The grounded theory method will be used for sample selection, data collection, and data analysis. Data will be collected in individual interviews and two focus group interviews. Approximately 26 - 32 participants will be needed. A verification focus group will also be conducted. Persons meeting study criteria will be interviewed not sooner than one month following the patient's death. Data will be analyzed using the constant comparative method. The findings will assist nurses to protect the autonomy of patients and to respond to and meet the needs of family member surrogate decision-makers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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