2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161414
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mixed Methods Research: Caregiver Mood Management
Abstract:
Mixed Methods Research: Caregiver Mood Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ayres, Lioness
Contact Address:SON, K6/250 Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA
Nursing researchers increasingly are integrating qualitative and quantitative methods into mixed-methods designs. Mixed methods designs place greater importance on the research question than on methodologies or paradigms (Tashakkori & Teddlie, 1998) and thus open the way to the use of multiple data collection and analysis strategies and the use of both narrative and numerical data. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the usefulness of mixed methods research in a study of family caregiving. It uses the example of a secondary analysis of a study in which both qualitative (narrative) and quantitative (numeric) data were collected and analyzed. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to explore the ways caregivers managed their own affective responses to caregiving. Text describing informants’ accounts of their approaches to managing their own affective responses to caregiving were grouped into two general categories: prevention/control strategies and laissez faire strategies. Only 4 of 36 caregivers described using strategies from both categories, while the rest relied on strategies from one category or the other. Caregivers who used prevention/control strategies deliberately chose not to think about unpleasant aspects of caregiving including future hardships or losses. In contrast, caregivers who used laissez faire strategies described “dwelling” or ruminating on current and future difficulties. These two categories of mood management strategies were “quantized” into variables and used in a logistic regression with scores on the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Regression models controlled for caregiver race and gender. Findings from the logistic regression suggest that differences in mood management strategies influenced caregivers’ mood distress even when race and gender were controlled. Findings support the research of Nolen-Hoeksema and others on the role of ruminative coping in anxiety and depression. In addition, this analysis indicates the contribution of mixed methods in understanding a complex phenomenon. AN: MN030224
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMixed Methods Research: Caregiver Mood Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161414-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mixed Methods Research: Caregiver Mood Management </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ayres, Lioness</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, K6/250 Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing researchers increasingly are integrating qualitative and quantitative methods into mixed-methods designs. Mixed methods designs place greater importance on the research question than on methodologies or paradigms (Tashakkori &amp; Teddlie, 1998) and thus open the way to the use of multiple data collection and analysis strategies and the use of both narrative and numerical data. The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate the usefulness of mixed methods research in a study of family caregiving. It uses the example of a secondary analysis of a study in which both qualitative (narrative) and quantitative (numeric) data were collected and analyzed. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to explore the ways caregivers managed their own affective responses to caregiving. Text describing informants&rsquo; accounts of their approaches to managing their own affective responses to caregiving were grouped into two general categories: prevention/control strategies and laissez faire strategies. Only 4 of 36 caregivers described using strategies from both categories, while the rest relied on strategies from one category or the other. Caregivers who used prevention/control strategies deliberately chose not to think about unpleasant aspects of caregiving including future hardships or losses. In contrast, caregivers who used laissez faire strategies described &ldquo;dwelling&rdquo; or ruminating on current and future difficulties. These two categories of mood management strategies were &ldquo;quantized&rdquo; into variables and used in a logistic regression with scores on the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Regression models controlled for caregiver race and gender. Findings from the logistic regression suggest that differences in mood management strategies influenced caregivers&rsquo; mood distress even when race and gender were controlled. Findings support the research of Nolen-Hoeksema and others on the role of ruminative coping in anxiety and depression. In addition, this analysis indicates the contribution of mixed methods in understanding a complex phenomenon. AN: MN030224 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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