Do Self Care Needs, Resources, and Quality of Life Measures Change Over Time in Persons with Heart Failure Treated Medically or After Transplant?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161415
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Self Care Needs, Resources, and Quality of Life Measures Change Over Time in Persons with Heart Failure Treated Medically or After Transplant?
Abstract:
Do Self Care Needs, Resources, and Quality of Life Measures Change Over Time in Persons with Heart Failure Treated Medically or After Transplant?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2003
Author:Baas, Linda
Contact Address:CON, PO Box 210038, 3110 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Co-Authors:Theresa A. Beery; Gordon A. Allen; Lynne E. Wagoner
Heart failure (HF), a chronic and progressive disorder, imposes profound physical and emotional demands on the person. The decline in cardiac function can increase the need for support and eventually resources may become depleted. When that happens, quality of life (QOL) may decline. However, heart transplantation (TX) may improve QOL and preserve resources. To determine if these relationships exist, 153 persons with HF were recruited and followed for 3years. At entry, the mean age was 56 years, LVEF .24, and 65% were male. All completed the Index of Well Being, SF-36, Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire, and Self Care Resource Inventory. The first three tools examine global, health-related and disease specific QOL respectively. The last tool assesses self care needs and available self care resources. Subjects were surveyed every 6 months for 3 years. Over time, 25% expired, 20% failed to complete all surveys, 10% withdrew, and others were lost to follow-up. The 40 who completed all data points are included in this report and 15 of these underwent TX by the end of the study. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed for each QOL and self care measure examining differences for the HF and TX groups. There was a significant difference on the Physical Composite Score of the SF-36 (p<.05) with both groups demonstrating improvement over time (HF 30 to 39th percentile, TX 29 to 45th percentile). Both groups showed significant improvements on the emotional subscale of the Minnesota Living with HF tool indicating symptoms were less bothersome. There were no significant treatment group, age, or gender differences in self care needs or resources available over time. Despite the progressive nature of HF and the improved cardiac function offered by TX, most measures of QOL remained relatively stable over time as did the needs and available self care resources. AN: MN030133
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Self Care Needs, Resources, and Quality of Life Measures Change Over Time in Persons with Heart Failure Treated Medically or After Transplant?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161415-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Self Care Needs, Resources, and Quality of Life Measures Change Over Time in Persons with Heart Failure Treated Medically or After Transplant? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baas, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, PO Box 210038, 3110 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Theresa A. Beery; Gordon A. Allen; Lynne E. Wagoner</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Heart failure (HF), a chronic and progressive disorder, imposes profound physical and emotional demands on the person. The decline in cardiac function can increase the need for support and eventually resources may become depleted. When that happens, quality of life (QOL) may decline. However, heart transplantation (TX) may improve QOL and preserve resources. To determine if these relationships exist, 153 persons with HF were recruited and followed for 3years. At entry, the mean age was 56 years, LVEF .24, and 65% were male. All completed the Index of Well Being, SF-36, Minnesota Living with HF Questionnaire, and Self Care Resource Inventory. The first three tools examine global, health-related and disease specific QOL respectively. The last tool assesses self care needs and available self care resources. Subjects were surveyed every 6 months for 3 years. Over time, 25% expired, 20% failed to complete all surveys, 10% withdrew, and others were lost to follow-up. The 40 who completed all data points are included in this report and 15 of these underwent TX by the end of the study. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed for each QOL and self care measure examining differences for the HF and TX groups. There was a significant difference on the Physical Composite Score of the SF-36 (p&lt;.05) with both groups demonstrating improvement over time (HF 30 to 39th percentile, TX 29 to 45th percentile). Both groups showed significant improvements on the emotional subscale of the Minnesota Living with HF tool indicating symptoms were less bothersome. There were no significant treatment group, age, or gender differences in self care needs or resources available over time. Despite the progressive nature of HF and the improved cardiac function offered by TX, most measures of QOL remained relatively stable over time as did the needs and available self care resources. AN: MN030133 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:20:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:20:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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